John Cashman & Sons
Photos and documents concerning John Cashman & Sons, a Quincy-based business founded by John Cashman.


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019 1914 Rocks Bridge Contractor John Cashman
019 1914 Rocks Bridge Contractor John Cashman
Rocks Bridge - Rebuilt East of the Channel - 1914 - Contractors - John Cashman, Sons Company - Boston, Mass. 
 
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019 1915 Bellevue Standpipe Masonry Tower
019 1915 Bellevue Standpipe Masonry Tower
Bellevue Standpipe, built by John Cashman & Sons Co. in 1914-15. The Bellevue Standpipe was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1990.  NATIONAL REGISTER CRITERIA STATEMENT: The Bellevue Standpipe is one of three vertical reservoirs built by the Metropolitan Water Board as part of their distribution system and in response to demands for increasing amounts of water as suburban populations expanded. All three have a unique architectural style which clearly demonstrates the water board’s commitment to good design and sensitivity to the surrounding community. Additionally, the Bellevue Standpipe is an important component of the Metropolitan Water Board’s in-town distribution system. The Bellevue Standpipe possesses integrity of location, setting, materials, workmanship and associations. It meets criteria C of the National Register of Historic Places.    ARCHITECTURAL SIGNIFICANCE: The Bellevue Tower is in Stony Brook Reservation, an uninhabited and rugged area which was made into a park designed by the Olmsted Brothers in 1894. The tower contains a steel tank which holds the water; the masonry tower is actually concrete faced with rough cut granite stones. The stone tower is 330 feet above street level and 90 feet above high water at Fisher Hill Reservoir and was built to prevent ice on the steel tank. It also was used as an observation tower. The granite tower is 114’ x 47’. HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This picturesque, stone tower was built as part of the southern extra high service distribution system. It replaced a smaller shingle style standpipe built in 1888. Water was pumped from Fisher Hill Reservoir, via a 20-inch main, to the Hyde Park Pumping Station and then up to Bellevue Hill where it was distributed, via gravity to the surrounding communities. It is out of service today. 
 
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019 1916 Bellevue Standpipes
019 1916 Bellevue Standpipes
Low, round masonry tower on left built in 1914-1915 by John Cashman & Sons Co. on Bellevue Hill in West Roxbury. This tower was added to the National Historic Register in 1990 under the categories of Architecture/Engineering/Structure. The, smaller, shingle-style tower on right was built in 1888 by someone else. 
 
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019 1921 Fort Heath Map
019 1921 Fort Heath Map
John Cashman & Sons won the bid for the seawall at Fort Heath. Fort Heath was built in 1898 as a Coast Artillery fort, located on Grovers Cliff in Winthrop, Massachusetts, and was part of the defenses of Boston Harbor. It was named in honor of General William Heath, who served in the American Revolution. The three 12-inch guns of Battery Winthrop at Fort Heath, along with the 16 12-inch coast defense mortars of nearby Fort Banks, made Winthrop the most heavily armed part of the harbor defenses. Today, all traces of earlier military activity are gone. The old Coast Artillery gun batteries have been removed, the artillery observation stations have been demolished, and the area has been completely re-graded. At the site in 2011 are a public park for the Town of Winthrop and the luxurious Forth Heath Apartments. 
 
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019 2011 Rocks Village Bridge over Merrimack River
019 2011 Rocks Village Bridge over Merrimack River
Builder:Spans 1, 2 & 3: Boston Bridge Works; Spans 4, 5, & 6: John Cashman & Sons, McClintic Marshall Co. (steel); Municipality:Haverhill-West Newbury     Bridge Owner:Massachusetts Highway Department     Facility On Bridge:Rocks Village Bridge Feature Under Bridge:Merrimack River     Date Built:1883, 1895, 1914 Date Rebuilt:      Overall Length:812'  History of Bridge:  Seat's Ferry was in operation on or near this crossing in the early 18th century; in 1794 the Massachusetts Legislature incorporated the Merrimack Bridge proprietors and approved construction of a bridge on this site. This was apparently built within the next year. The original bridge had been destroyed by 1828 when the legislature approved construction of a new bridge on the old foundations, to be 22 feet above high water at the Haverhill end. In 1862 the County commissioners were authorized to relocate and reconstruct the draw (implying that a drawspan of some kind has previously been in use here) and the present iron spans 2 & 3 were the result (the bridge had been made public in 1868). The County Commissioners were authorized to build a new iron westerly span and new abutments in 1894; the result is the structure of span 1. From 1868-1909, the towns of Haverhill & W. Newbury split the maintenance on the bride; in 1909 the County assumed full responsibility. The Legislature approved construction of the 3 eastern steel truss spans (spans 4, 5, and 6) to replace the two old wooden spans between the draw span and the West Newbury shore in 1913.    Significance of Bridge  The Rocks Village Bridge contains the oldest movable span among all the bridges presently under MassHighway purview. It is located adjacent to the Rocks Village National Register Historic District, on a site which has been utilized as a major Merrimack River crossing since at least as the early 18th century. To date, only 44 movable bridges have been identified in MassHighway database; 13 of these are swing bridges, and 9 of the 13 are rim-bearing swings. The Rocks Bridge, the oldest of them all, is still operated by hand.    It is one of the earliest riveted (as opposed to pin-connected) metal trusses yet identified in the MassHighway inventory, and the earliest known surviving work discovered to date of the Boston Bridge Works, an important and extremely prolific Massachusetts bridge building firm active from the 1870's through the 1930's.       Overall Width:26.8' 
 
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019 unkn Fort Heath
019 unkn Fort Heath
John Cashman & Sons won the bid for the seawall at Fort Heath.  Fort Heath was built in 1898 as a Coast Artillery fort, located on Grovers Cliff in Winthrop, Massachusetts, and was part of the defenses of Boston Harbor. It was named in honor of General William Heath, who served in the American Revolution. The three 12-inch guns of Battery Winthrop at Fort Heath, along with the 16 12-inch coast defense mortars of nearby Fort Banks, made Winthrop the most heavily armed part of the harbor defenses.  Today, all traces of earlier military activity are gone. The old Coast Artillery gun batteries have been removed, the artillery observation stations have been demolished, and the area has been completely re-graded. At the site in 2011 are a public park for the Town of Winthrop and the luxurious Forth Heath Apartments. 
 


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