REARDON, Paul Cashman

REARDON, Paul Cashman

Male 1909 - 1988  (78 years)

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  • Name REARDON, Paul Cashman  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14
    Born 23 Dec 1909  Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15
    Education 1927  Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    graduated from Quincy High School 
    Education 1928  Andover, Essex, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    attended Phillips Academy 
    Education 1932  Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    graduated cum laude, Harvard College 
    Education 1935  Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    graduated from Harvard Law School 
    Christened 4 Oct 1960 
    Died 29 Jul 1988  Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    030 1988 Father Hanlon eulogy
    030 1988 Father Hanlon eulogy
    030 1988 Paul C Reardon death article
    030 1988 Paul C Reardon death article
    This article is from the Patriot Ledger and is about Paul C. Readon's death.
    030 1988 Paul C Reardon funeral
    030 1988 Paul C Reardon funeral
    This article is from the Patriot Ledger and is about Paul C. Reardon's funeral
    Obituary 31 Jul 1988  Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    Boston Globe 
    Notes 
    • Paul Cashman Reardon of Hingham, a retired associate justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court and a nationally recognized specialist on judicial procedure, died Friday in Massachusetts General Hospital. He was 78. He was named to the commonwealth's highest bench by Gov. John A. Volpe in 1962. Before that he had served for seven years as chief judge of the Massachusetts Superior Court. He stepped down from the Supreme Judicial Court bench on Jan. 1, 1977. During his tenure on the SJC, he wrote 610 opinions, including ones upholding the state's no-fault auto insurance law and directing the Boston School Committee to comply with the state's racial imbalance law. Warren E. Burger, retired chief justice of the US Supreme Court, upon learning of the death of Justice Reardon, said, "Apart from being one of the outstanding jurists in the country, he was one of the great leaders of judicial improvement and served as the first president of the National Center for State Courts. His interests and activities in the improvement of justice continued long after his retirement."  As chief judge of the lower court, Justice Reardon was credited in large measure with easing a backlog of cases that had made some of the courts among the most congested in the nation. Under his leadership the waiting time to bring a case before the courts was reduced from three years to one. He was co-founder of the Joint Committee for Continuing Legal Education, which later became the New England Law Institute, and helped keep lawyers updated on changes in the law. After retiring from the SJC, he dedicated his time to shoring up the state courts. "We have in being a National Center for State Courts, with headquarters in Williamsburg, and we are working constantly in all the fifty states to improve the delivery of justice" he wrote in 1982, in the 50th anniversary report of his Harvard class." Chief Justice Vanderbilt of New Jersey said a long time back, 'Judicial reform is no sport for the shortwinded.' Twenty-five years ago there was no communication to speak of between state court systems. Now there is. I have played a part in this and as long as my wind holds out I intend to work in this most important field." Of his many findings on both benches, among the most controversial were contained in a report of a committee he headed for the American Bar Association. The committee was established in December 1964 in the aftermath of the Warren Commission report on President John F. Kennedy's assassination. It studied the effect of press crime stories on jury trials throughout the country. The 265-page report, "Standards Relating to Fair Trial and Free Press" was released in December 1966. It recommended rules for lawyers, courts and law enforcement officials to follow in preventing news stories from prejudicing juries in criminal cases. The American Society of Newspaper Editors, along with other organizations of journalists, complained that the recommendations infringed on the First Amendment's guarantee of freedom of speech. But Justice Reardon defended his position. His strong convictions on the perpetual conflict between a fair trial and a free press were a subject on which he had written and spoken prolifically around the world. By 1973 he was proud to note that his committee's suggestions had been included in some form in codes of ethics and conduct for lawyers and judges in all 50 states.    While not many official codes were adopted by the press, a large number of "guides" on fair trial coverage were prepared and are now in use in newsrooms through the country. Justice Reardon was known for his dry wit and humor. While he was presiding over arguments on the role of the press at the inquest into the death of Mary Jo Kopechne, who drowned at Chappaquiddick in Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's car, the assistant district attorney read a statement that advocated full press coverage of the court proceedings. Justice Reardon asked who had written the statement.    "Paul C. Reardon and somebody else" the assistant district attorney replied, glancing at his notes with some confusion. "Well then," said the justice with a broad, crescent-shaped grin, "it must be half right." The passage referred to was from "Fair Trial and Free Press," a book Justice Reardon had written with Clifton Daniel, an executive of the New York Times. A reformer, rather than a revolutionary, the judge was a scholarly, mild-mannered man much admired for his integrity and keen ability to extract practical solutions to often ponderous and anachronistic legal statutes. As one admirer put it: "He's an amazing guy at getting his teeth into something complex. The more complex it is the better he likes it." One example of his practical solutions is known in Massachusetts law schools and elsewhere as the "Reardon Fish Chowder Opinion." The case involved a young woman who had choked on a fish bone while eating chowder in a Boston waterfront restaurant and who underwent surgery to remove the bone. She sued the restaurant and won in the lower courts. But the restaurant's lawyers decided to make a test case of it and the matter was assigned to Justice Reardon. During his deliberations he leaned heavily on his own culinary skills. He cited several famous fish chowder recipes calling for a generous measure of bones and went on to say that anyone who had grown up in the Greater Boston area should know that. His black-robed colleagues unanimously agreed and the suit was overturned. Justice Reardon was also widely known for his photographic memory. "Why, I showed him my Social Security number once and he repeated it to me months later," a friend recalled. "I couldn't remember it myself and had to dig to find it and see that he was right." Justice Reardon was born in Quincy, the son of Dr. Daniel B. Reardon, onetime president of the Massachusetts Medical Society, and Mary (Cashman) Reardon. Years later he used to joke about his birthdate, Dec. 23, declaring that he "never had much of a birthday party because the family couldn't take time off from Christmas shopping to pay tribute to me." He graduated from Quincy High School in 1927, then spent an additional year at Phillips Academy, Andover, before entering Harvard. At Harvard he was a star debater and class orator, graduating cum laude in 1932. He graduated from Harvard Law School three years later. After he was admitted to the bar in 1935, he started his own firm, specializing in insurance and damage cases. A lawyer friend of those days said: "He was very persuasive before a jury and a good cross-examiner, never unfair or brow-beating, but able to show up a witness when he was lying."In World War II, the associate justice served with the Navy as a lieutenant in the legal division of the Bureau of Ships. After the war he signed on with the Boston law firm of Haussermann, Davison and Shattuck, becoming a managing partner. Although a Republican, as was his father, Justice Reardon never took an active part in local or state political campaigns, even after joining Gov. Christian A. Herter's staff in 1953 as special counsel and adviser. At the time, Herter was desperately looking for a bright young lawyer who could help him push through legislation to bring order to the Boston Port Authority. Justice Reardon succeeded and the governor increasingly relied on his judgment. Two years later Herter made him chief judge of the Massachusetts Superior Court.The news shook many of the court's 44 judges. Some of them openly grumbled that he had never served in a judicial capacity and at 45 was probably going to be the youngest chief judge in the history of that body.    The new chief judge pushed through a number of reforms that improved the efficiency of the court and earned their respect. He was a past president of the Harvard Alumni Association and former chairman of the executive committee of Harvard's Board of Overseers. He was also the chairman of the Judicial Council of Massachusetts and vice president of the Massachusetts Historical Society. In 1983, he was appointed a special master by the US Supreme Court to help resolve a 100-year-old dispute between Missouri and Arkansas. His decision was accepted unanimously by both sides. In the same year, he was appointed chairman of the Safe School Commission, established to study violence in the Boston public schools. The commission issued a report that included dozens of recommendations for reducing the violence. As a champion of the rights of the individual and the sanctity of the law, Justice Reardon was honored by the American Bar Association for distinguished service in the administration of justice. He was cited for having shown "the finest in professional achievement" and for personifying "the type of lawyer we'd like to think ourselves a brother of." Justice Reardon leaves his wife, the former Ann Leich; two sons, David of Hancock, N.H., and Thomas of Newton; two daughters, Martha Reardon of Hingham and Jane Labys of Morgantown, W.V.; a brother, George of Hingham; a sister, Mary Reardon, also of Hingham; and five grandchildren. A third son, Robert, died in childhood in 1951. A funeral Mass will be said for Justice Reardon at 10 a.m. on Wednesday in St. Paul's Church in Hingham. Burial will be in Mt. Wollaston Cemetery, Quincy.

    Father REARDON, Daniel Bartholomew,   b. 15 Oct 1877, Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jul 1961, Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Mother CASHMAN, Mary Agnes "Minnie",   b. 28 Oct 1877, Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Apr 1952, Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Married 2 Jun 1908  Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 

    Spouse LEICH, Ann L. "Deeter",   b. 3 Sep 1913, Evansville, Vanderburgh, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Aug 2006, Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years) 
    Married 1939  Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Living
    +2. Living
    +3. REARDON, Jane Elizabeth,   b. 8 Apr 1944, Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jul 1996, near East Morches, Suffolk, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)  [unknown]
    +4. Living
     5. REARDON, Robert "Bobby",   b. 27 Mar 1948, Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Sep 1951, Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 3 years)  [unknown]

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 23 Dec 1909 - Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEducation - graduated from Quincy High School - 1927 - Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEducation - attended Phillips Academy - 1928 - Andover, Essex, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEducation - graduated cum laude, Harvard College - 1932 - Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEducation - graduated from Harvard Law School - 1935 - Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1939 - Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - REARDON, Jane Elizabeth - 8 Apr 1944 - Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - REARDON, Robert "Bobby" - 27 Mar 1948 - Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 29 Jul 1988 - Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsObituary - Boston Globe - 31 Jul 1988 - Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    030 unkn Paul Cashman Reardon headshot
    030 unkn Paul Cashman Reardon headshot
    026 1914c Paul and Mary Reardon
    026 1914c Paul and Mary Reardon
    Martha Bewick writes, "This is a photo of Mary A. Reardon (born in 1912) and Paul C. Reardon (born in 1909). It could have been taken in 1914 and probably behind their home at 1200 Hancock Street in Quincy MA. The house was one of those on "Doctors' Row" on Hancock Street. The house had been built by Thomas Adams in the 1700s, and is now the location of the Citizens Bank building." Handwritten note on reverse reads: Love and best wishes to Charles for many happy birthdays - Paul and Mary" [Photo credit: collection of Martha Reardon Bewick]
    026 1915c Daniel B Reardon family portrait by Rice
    026 1915c Daniel B Reardon family portrait by Rice
    Dr. Daniel Bartholomew Reardon and his young family circa 1915. This photo was taken at the Sue Rice Studio in Quincy, MA. From L to R: , Mary Cashman Reardon (around age 38), Paul Cashman Reardon (around age 6), Daniel Bartholomew Reardon (around age 38), and Mary Agnes Reardon (around age 3). This photo was taken shortly before Dr. Reardon volunteered for service as a battlefield surgeon with the British Medical Corps in France during World War I. [Photo credit: collection of Martha Reardon Bewick]
    026 1919c Daniel B Reardon family portrait by Rice
    026 1919c Daniel B Reardon family portrait by Rice
    Dr. Daniel Bartholomew Reardon and his young family. This photo was taken at the Sue Rice Studio in Quincy, MA, around 1919. From L to R: Mary Agnes Reardon (1912-2002), Mary Cashman Reardon (1877-1952), Daniel Bartholomew Reardon 1877-1961), George Daniel Reardon (1916-1998) and Paul Cashman Reardon (1909-1988). [NOTE of Donna J. Goldstein: Martha Bewick estimated that this photo was taken around 1917, but I think it more likely to be 1919, at which time, George would have been 3, Mary Agnes 7 and Paul 10. In 1917, George would have only been 1 yr old, and this child looks older than that.] [Photo credit: collection of Martha Reardon Bewick]
    026 1920c Reardon children with tennis racquets
    026 1920c Reardon children with tennis racquets
    Reardon children posing with tennis racquets. The summer attire and water view suggest that this photo may have been taken at the Reardon family's summer home at Post Island on Hough's Neck in Quincy, MA. From L to R: Mary Reardon, George Reardon, Paul Reardon. [Photo credit: collection of Martha Reardon Bewick]
    026 1921c Reardon children on fence
    026 1921c Reardon children on fence
    This is a wonderful childhood photo of (L to R) George, Mary and Paul Reardon, children of Dr. and Mrs. Daniel B. Reardon, sitting on a fence, perhaps at Post Island in Quincy, MA, where they spent many happy summers. [Photo credit: collection of Martha Reardon Bewick]
    026 1915c Paul and Mary Reardon at Cedar Bluff
    026 1915c Paul and Mary Reardon at Cedar Bluff
    Martha Bewick writes: "The boy to the left is Paul C. Reardon (1909 - 1988), and the girl to the right is Mary A. Reardon (1912 - 2002). This is probably taken at Post Island in Quincy, Massachusetts." [NOTE of Donna J. Goldstein: the house in the background looks like "Cedar Bluff" the Cashman summer home at 20 Bayview Avenue in the Hough's Neck section of Quincy, MA.] [Photo credit: collection of Martha Reardon Bewick]
    027 1927c Christmas gathering
    027 1927c Christmas gathering
    A very blurry photograph, believed to be the work of the Sue Rice Studio of Quincy, Mass. The decorated tree in the background and ages of the children suggests that this group shot was taken at Christmas time, circa 1927. At present, only seven of the people in the photo have been identified.  Paul Cashman Reardon is standing in the back row, fourth man from left. Henry A. Cashman, is standing in the back row, fifth man from left. Anna Zita Cashman is standing in the back row, third from right. Henry Hamel is standing in the back row, second from right. Ruth Cashman (white buttons and straight bangs), is kneeling in the second row, second from left. Helen Cashman Hamel is sitting in the front row, second from right. [Photo credit: collection of Martha Reardon Bewick]
    026 1930c Reardons on beach in Nice
    026 1930c Reardons on beach in Nice
    Caption reads, "With her father and brothers, Mary enjoys the beach in Nice, France, during her grand tour of the continent." From L to R: George Reardon, Paul C. Reardon, Mary Agnes Reardon, Daniel B. Reardon. [Photo credit: "Mary Reardon's Creation," page 5, collection of Martha Reardon Bewick]
    026 1910c Paul Cashman Reardon portrait by Nevis
    026 1910c Paul Cashman Reardon portrait by Nevis
    Martha Reardon Bewick says that this is a photo of her father Paul Cashman Reardon as a baby. "Nevis - Quincy" is penciled on the matte. [Photo credit: collection of Jean Cashman (1926-2005) courtesy of Brian Cashman]

    Documents
    030 1988 eulogy by Peter J Gomes
    030 1988 eulogy by Peter J Gomes
    Peter J Gomes's eulogy for Paul C Reardon's funeral.
    030 1939 Paul Cashman book mention
    030 1939 Paul Cashman book mention
    Mention of Paul Cashman Reardon's book on page 132; "The Practice of Medicine in Colonial New England," by Paul C. Reardon, of Quincy.
    030 1939 Paul Cashman mention
    030 1939 Paul Cashman mention
    This was found in the Proceedings of the N.E. Hist. Gen. Society. The mention of Paul Cashman Reardon on page 83 reads; After these three reports had been accepted, President Whitwell introduced Paul Cashman Reardon of Quincy, who wove a narrative both fascinating and humorous about The Practice of Medicine in Colonial New England.
    030 unkn Paul C Reardon citation
    030 unkn Paul C Reardon citation
    A citation on Paul C. Reardon.
    030 unkn Paul C Reardon memorial
    030 unkn Paul C Reardon memorial
    a memorial on Paul C. Reardon.
    026 1932 Bon Voyage from Hannah to Paul Reardon
    026 1932 Bon Voyage from Hannah to Paul Reardon
    Greeting card and envelope signed and addressed by Hannah Falvey Cashman on the occasion of Daniel B. and Paul C. Reardon's departure for England. [Source credit: collection of Martha Reardon Bewick]

    Histories
    030 1988 Boston Bar Journal article
    030 1988 Boston Bar Journal article
    Boston Bar Journal Article in Memoriam of Paul Cashman Reardon 1909-1988.
    030 1988 Father Hanlon eulogy
    030 1988 Father Hanlon eulogy

    Videos
    026 1930 Reardon Trip to Ireland
    026 1930 Reardon Trip to Ireland
    Home movies captured by Dr. Daniel Bartholomew Reardon during the summer of 1930. [Available through the generosity of Anne Marie Reardon and the rest of the Reardon family.]

    Business
    030 unkn Judge Has Knack for Limelight
    030 unkn Judge Has Knack for Limelight

    Immigration & Travel
    026 1931 S S Stuttgart from Cherbourg passenger list
    026 1931 S S Stuttgart from Cherbourg passenger list
    Year: 1931; Arrival: , ; Microfilm serial: T715; Microfilm roll: T715_5025; Line: 14; List number: . On the same ship were William J. Cashman and Anna Zita Barry.

    News
    030 1988 Paul C Reardon death article
    030 1988 Paul C Reardon death article
    This article is from the Patriot Ledger and is about Paul C. Readon's death.
    030 1988 Paul C Reardon funeral
    030 1988 Paul C Reardon funeral
    This article is from the Patriot Ledger and is about Paul C. Reardon's funeral
    030 1989 Memorial service article
    030 1989 Memorial service article
    An article in the Patriot Ledger about Paul C. Reardon's memorial service.
    030 1980 Paul C Reardon retirement
    030 1980 Paul C Reardon retirement
    At age 70, The Honorable Paul C. Reardon is having  "a wonderful time. "I enjoyed the last three or four years immensely. There are no more wild rides on the Expressway. The pressure goes off; the obligation of being in court everyday is gone. The work was exhausting, timetaking work." Judge Reardon of Hingham, was chief justice of the state's Superior Court system for seven years, and a state Supreme Court justice for 14. When he left the bench in 1976, at age 67, it was three years before he had to - mandatory retirement age for judges in Massachusetts is 70. He didn't really retire. He was in demand for new ventures. In a society that tends to put down the aging, he was, and is, part of a select group; judges, whose age and experience are more likely to make them valued and respected. "In the law, the older, and more experienced you are, the more people are going to listen. I like to think that is also true in other areas, but I guess it isn't. In manufacturing, new techniques take over," he says. The judge, a tall man with both reserve and warmth, is sitting at his desk at 16 Beacon St., the Boston Bar Association headquarters. A deep red carpet leads down a long corridor and up a winding spiral staircase to its third floor office. Portraits of distinguished jurists line the walls. In a nearby conference room, voices can be heard pondering a master's hearing case. Reardon drives into Boston three times a week now. He travels a good deal, part of his work as a fundraiser for the National Center for State Courts. The center was started by Reardon and judges from other states in 1971 in Williamsburg, Va., with the goal of improving the nation's courts. Reardon's work with the center has received wide notice. His views on what it's like to grow older have been kept more to himself. "You know, I don't really feel old. I don't regard 70 as an ancient age, though when I was 30 or 40 I might have. You don't charge around the way you did when you were 20, but I'm still rolling, walking, fishing, catching a trout or two." When he "retired" early from the bench, he says, it was because he has sense of "deja vu." "After you have written hundreds of cases (he wrote 600 while in the SJC), it can become a real chore. When you have case come up before you and you find yourself thinking, 'Here's one of them again,' it's time to move along. But I was fortunate - I had a place to go." One of the "myths of aging" is that older people can't learn new things - the "You can't teach an old dog new tricks" cliche. In fact, studies have shown that while older people may take longer to learn new material, they retain it better and are capable of understanding it on a deeper level. Judge Reardon says his memory is as sharp as it ever was. "I was always interested in American history and that is based in large part on memory. I've notice no change. We have a group in Boston, the Tavern Club, where we write, memorize and the put on our own shows. We have a great time down there," he says. Among his views on other topics: Retirement: "Some people find themselves lost, and it's well to plan ahead, so it's not too traumatic." Chief Justice: "I think if you call them as you see them, you are bound to create static, and seven or eight years is the outside length of term for an administrative post." Changes with age: "You are inclined to take a more relaxed, detached overview of things. Even even-tempered people tend to get uptight (in the daily grind before retirement.)" The Future: "There's a saying that judicial reform is no sport for the short-winded. And that is my project for the next few years."
    030 1988 Legal career article
    030 1988 Legal career article
    Article from The Boston Herald about Paul C. Reardon's legal career.
    030 unkn Judge Has Knack for Limelight
    030 unkn Judge Has Knack for Limelight
    026 1930 Paul C Reardon Harvard debate team
    026 1930 Paul C Reardon Harvard debate team
    "Will Represent Harvard on the Debate Platform" -- Newspaper clipping from the Boston Evening Transcript on Tuesday, February 4 1930. Depicts Paul Cashman Reardon, Harvard Class of '32, as Publicity Manager of the Harvard Debate Team. [Source credit: collection of Martha Reardon Bewick]
    026 1932 Drive through England
    026 1932 Drive through England
    Fourteen hundred miles of motoring behind the wheel of a right-side drive, hired car, through England, Wales and Scotland proved a delightful vacation for Dr. Daniel B. Reardon and son, Paul C. Reardon, according to an interesting resume of his journey told to members of the school committee last night. Historic cathedrals, the beautiful lake regions, Bobby Burns' home, Oxford college, military maneuvers, Druids' remains at Stonhenge [sic] and the beautiful scenery of the countryside were a few of the highlights of the trip. Dr. Reardon was highly complimentary for the exceptional service offered by the automobile club membership which provides telephone systems along the highways for calls that bring immediate service. These telephone booths are located throughout all sections of Great Britain, Dr. Reardon stated, and no charge is imposed other than membership in the club. Representatives of the association also direct traffic and give information. He stated the roads are equal and in many instances superior to those in this country. And the truck drivers are far more courteous than those of America, he discovered. One of the interesting visits of the trip was the stop at Oxford, where Paul met one of the Oxford university debaters who participated in the trans-Atlantic debate with Harvard's team, of which the local student was a member. Gasoline costs about 20 cents and one of the unusual features of motoring in the British Isles was the fact that it was necessary to drive the right instead of the opposite, in vogue in the United States. All cars are provided with right-side driver's seat, and this proved a unique innovation to the local travelers.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.

  • Sources 
    1. [S91] U.S. Public Records Index, Volume 2 on Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.).

    2. [S56] Ancestry Family Trees - Public, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2006.), Ancestry Family Trees (Reliability: 3).

    3. [S197] U.S. Social Security Death Index on Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.), Number: 046-01-9901; Issue State: Connecticut; Issue Date : Before 1951. (Reliability: 3).

    4. [S245] New Hampshire, Rockingham Co., Portsmouth - Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) on Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.).

    5. [S197] U.S. Social Security Death Index on Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.), Number: 012-03-9535; Issue State: Massachusetts; Issue Date : Before 1951. (Reliability: 3).

    6. [S104] Massachusetts - Death Index, 1970-2003 on Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.).

    7. [S179] New York - New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 on Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.), Paul Cashman Reardon, Year: 1931; Arrival: , ; Microfilm se rial: T715; Microfilm roll: T715_5025; Line: 14; List numbe r: . (Reliability: 3).
      026 1931 S S Stuttgart from Cherbourg passenger list
      026 1931 S S Stuttgart from Cherbourg passenger list
      Year: 1931; Arrival: , ; Microfilm serial: T715; Microfilm roll: T715_5025; Line: 14; List number: . On the same ship were William J. Cashman and Anna Zita Barry.


    8. [S68] 1930 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.), Year: 1930; Census Place: Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts; R oll: 936; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 88; Image: 154.0. (Reliability: 3).
      026 1920 US Census Daniel B Reardon household.jpg
      026 1920 US Census Daniel B Reardon household.jpg
      Year: 1930; Census Place: Quincy, Norfolk, Massachusetts; Roll: 936; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 88; Image: 154.0.


    9. [S66] 1910 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.), Year: 1910; Census Place: Quincy Ward 3, Norfolk, Massachus etts; Roll: ; Page: 2B; Enumeration District: 1142; Line: 6 4. (Reliability: 3).
      026 1910 US Census Daniel B Reardon household
      026 1910 US Census Daniel B Reardon household


    10. [S294] Massachusetts, Suffolk Co., Boston - Boston Passenger and Crew Lists, 1820-1954 on Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2006.Original data - Boston, Massachusetts. Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Boston, Massachusetts, 1891-1943. Micropublication T843. RG085. 454 rolls. National Archives, Washington,;), S. S. Scythia from Cobh; arrived Boston 31 Aug 1930; page 5 ; line 7; Paul Cashman Reardon (Reliability: 3).
      026 1930 Reardon Scythia passenger list
      026 1930 Reardon Scythia passenger list
      LIST OF UNITED STATES CITIZENS -- S. S. SCYTHIA sailing from COBH (QUEENSTOWN), 24th AUGUST, 1930, Arriving at Port of BOSTON 31 AUG 1930, page  5 -- line 5: Daniel Reardon, age 52, male, married, born Oct. 5th, 1877 in Quincy, Mass; line 6: Mary Reardon, age 52, female, married, born Oct. 28th, 1877 in Quincy, Mass; line 7: Paul Reardon, age 20, male, single, born Dec. 23rd, 1909 in Quincy, Mass.; line 8: Mary Reardon, age 17, female, single, born July 19th, 1912 in Quincy, Mass; line 9: George Reardon, age 13, male, single, born July 30th, 1916 in Quincy, Mass -- all give their address as 74 Greenleaf Street, Quincy, Mass.


    11. [S83] 1920 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.), Year: 1920; Census Place: Quincy Ward 1, Norfolk, Massachus etts; Roll: T625_723; Page: 14B; Enumeration District: 224 ; Image:  Line:  . (Reliability: 3).
      026 1920 US Census Daniel B Reardon household.jpg
      026 1920 US Census Daniel B Reardon household.jpg
      Year: 1920; Census Place: Quincy Ward 1, Norfolk, Massachusetts; Roll: T625_723; Page: 14B; Enumeration District: 224; Image: .


    12. [S179] New York - New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 on Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.), Year: 1931; Arrival: , ; Microfilm serial: T715; Microfil m roll: T715_5025; Line: 14; List number: . (Reliability: 3).

    13. [S78] U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 on Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.).
      030 1940 Reardon Quincy Directory
      030 1940 Reardon Quincy Directory
      page 419


    14. [S14] 1940 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.).
      030 1940 US Census Paul Reardon household
      030 1940 US Census Paul Reardon household


    15. [S57] Massachusetts, Suffolk Co., Boston - The Boston Globe on ProQuest, Massachusetts. Boston., (Name: Globe Newspaper Company, Inc.; Location: Boston, Mass.;), Driscoll, Edgar J.,. "Paul C. Reardon, Retired Justice of S upreme Judicial Court; at 78." Boston Globe (pre-1997 Fullt ext): 101. Boston Globe; Massachusetts Newsstand; ProQues t Central. Jul 31 1988. Web. 13 Jan. 2012 . (Reliability: 3).