CASHMAN, Luke John

CASHMAN, Luke John

Male 1866 - Aft 1905  (38 years)

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  • Name CASHMAN, Luke John  [1
    Born 5 Jul 1866  Hanover, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    006 1866 Luke Cashman birth register
    006 1866 Luke Cashman birth register
    BIRTHS REGISTERED in the Town of Hanover for the Year 1866 – No. 13, 5 Jul 1866, Luke J. Cashman, male, born in Hanover to James Cashman and Catherine Long of Hanover. Father is a laborer born in Ireland. Mother was born in Ireland.
    Christened 6 Aug 1866  Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Address:
    corner of Pleasant and Park Streets
    South Weymouth, Massachusetts
    USA 
    • Luke's godparents were John Spence and Annie Foye Spence.
    Name Luke J. Cashman  [4
    Died Aft 1 Jun 1905 
    Notes 
    • BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH of LUKE J. CASHMAN:

      We know that Luke J. Cashman was the youngest child of James Cashman and Catherine Long. He was born in Hanover on 5 Jul 1866 and lived there until at least 18 Jun 1880. On 14 Dec 1884, at age 18, he became godfather to his niece, Helen Frances Cashman, daughter of John Cashman and Hannah Falvey, at St John the Baptist Church in Quincy. In 1891, at age 24, he worked as a teamster in Quincy and resided in a house at 37 Cross Street with his mom, Catherine.

      Sometime between 1891 and Aug 1892, around age 25, he moved from Quincy to Brooklyn, NY. Land records of the heirs of James Cashman list Luke's place of residence as Brooklyn, NY in Aug 1892 and Feb 1893.

      On 27 October 1897, 31 year-old, Luke Cashman married 18 year-old Mary F. McKenna. Mary's sister, Margaret, was a witness along with Maurice Ryan. The ceremony was performed by the Right Rev. Alexius Edelbrock, O. S. B., a German priest and Abbot of St. Anselm's Priory. It would appear that the newlyweds made their home with Mary's family because records from 1898 and 1900 show him living at 950 East 149th Street, a private dwelling in the Bronx, with his wife, his mother-in-law, Ella McKenna, and his wife's teenaged siblings, Margaret and Francis.

      On 20 Sep 1898, Luke and Minnie, as his wife was sometimes called, welcomed the birth of a son, who they named Arthur L. Cashman. Sadly, this child died four days later. The cause of death was listed as "non-closure of Foramen Ovale," which means that the child's heart did not form properly. No other children have been found to date.
      In June of 1900, he and Minnie were still living with Minnie's mother and siblings. Luke was 33 years old and working as a policeman. For an exploration of what it was like to be a policeman in New York City in 1900, see the Appendix.

      An article which appeared in the New York Times on August 4, 1900 gives us an idea of Luke's physical abilities. The article describes an incident where a spooked horse bolted down Madison Avenue for several blocks until he was stopped by Policeman Cashman.

      Cashman, who was then assigned to the East 51st Street Station, "sprang forward and endeavored to grab [the horse]. Cashman, who is a six footer, weighing over 200 pounds, grabbed the horse by the harness in front and hung on. The horse swerved and the policeman went under his feet. Policeman Scanlon succeeded in helping Cashman to bring [the horse] to a slow pace. Scanlon then jumped into the wagon and drove up to the Knickerbocker Athletic Club. Officer Cashman, with his uniform in strips, followed on foot, attended by a crowd. Policeman Cashman's right arm was dislocated…but did not appear to mind his injury." A competing paper, The New York Daily Tribune, described the incident as follows: "Cashman, who is a big man, was dragged across the street narrowly escaping being thrown into the excavation which has been made to equip the railroad with underground trolleys. One wheel passed over his right arm, causing a severe contusion."

      In late September 1900, Patrolman Luke J. Cashman was transferred from the 24th Precinct (today known as the 17th Precinct), located in midtown Manhattan at 167 East 51st Street, to the 31st Precinct (today known as the 19th Precinct), located on the Upper East Side at 153 East 67th Street in Manhattan.

      On 9 Jul 1902, an article appeared on page 6 of the New York Tribune stating that New York Police Commissioner Partridge dismissed Patrolman Luke J. Cashman from the police force on 8 Jul 1902. Patrolman Cashman was tried before Deputy Commissioner Thurston and found guilty of assaulting Patrolman Grant Williams, of the Alexander Ave station. The dismissal was made on the recommendation of Commissioner Thurston. Patrolman Williams said in his complaint against Cashman that the two had a little difficulty over a private affair, and that Cashman had gone to The Bronx, and, after insulting Williams on his post, had struck him and knocked him down. He produced several witnesses to testify that he had been assaulted by Cashman.

      On 14 Jul 1902, just five days after he was dismissed, Luke initiated legal action to appeal the decision with the Supreme Court of Kings County. Kings County Supreme Court upheld the ruling of the lower court. Luke appealed the decision again and the case ended up before the New York State Supreme Court. This court also upheld the decisions of the lower courts and Luke was not reinstated.

      In 1905, at age 38, he still lived at 950 East 149th Street, but was working as a construction foreman instead of as a policeman. His wife, Minnie, was listed as head of a household that no longer contained her mother, but still contained her siblings, now in their twenties.

      Luke's wife, Minnie, died at age 30 on Dec 29, 1909 at St. Francis Hospital in the South Bronx. The cause of death was chronic parenchymatous nephritis, which is a chronic inflammation of the kidney. At the time of her death, she was living on Jackson Avenue in the Bronx. She is buried in St. Raymond's Cemetery in the Bronx with her baby, Arthur, her parents, Patrick and Ellen McKenna, and her siblings, Francis, Margaret, James, Agnes and Bertha. Luke is not buried there.

      After 1909, Luke did not leave much of a paper trail. His name is not found in the federal or NY state censuses of 1910, 1915, 1920, 1925 or 1930. Perhaps he changed his name? The 1940 federal census reports a Luke J. Cashman, age 73, living at the Sovol Hotel in Manhattan. This Luke Cashman is a widower living alone and lists his birthplace as Massachusetts. He no longer works but states that he has income from other sources. While the age, marital status and origin match, we can't be 100% certain that this is our Luke J. Cashman without corroborating evidence.

      In summary, it does not appear likely that Luke had any children that lived past the age of ten. They were married in 1897, had a child who died in 1898, were childless in the 1900 and 1905 censuses. His wife died in 1909. It is possible that Luke and Minnie had a child between 1905 and 1909 but, as yet, no evidence has been found to support this.

      APPENDIX: New York City Police Department 1898-1902

      Luke Cashman was a New York City policeman from at least 1898 to 1902, a period when the Irish controlled the machinery of the city through Tammany Hall. This was a time of great police demoralization and officer corruption. Police ruled the streets with nightsticks, extorting vast sums of money from the flourishing vice industry which included prostitution, gambling and after-hours saloons.

      "Under Tammany the general system of blackmail was two-fold in scope. The force as a force blackmailed every available kind of vice and crime, and extorted tribute from all who were in positions to be harassed by police power. In turn, the ruling powers at headquarters 'grafted' upon the force itself. No member of the force could secure promotion, and no applicant for appointment to the force could secure the appointment, unless he paid the specified sum expected from him. A captain seeking promotion to the position of inspector was expected to pay from $15,000 to $20,000 to 'get the goods' … Sergeants seeking promotion to the position of captain had to pay from $12,000 to $15,000… Roundsmen seeking promotion to the grade of captain were expected to pay $2,500; and patrolmen seeking promotion, $1000 to $1500. Applicants for the position of patrolmen had to pay $300."

      "It was generally understood that transfers could be secured for payment, and that complaints by sergeants and roundsmen were against men who had no influential friends. … It was a common station house rumor that if you paid $25 you would be 'taken care of for a year.'  - from
      The Police Department of the City of New York

      Luke most likely had to pay $300 to obtain his position as a patrolman. In addition to the dangers that every policeman faces in the course of his job, a New York patrolman at the turn of the century would have other concerns as well.

      "The men in the force regulated their conduct with the conviction that, if they did anything hostile to the criminal element which they believed to be in control of the force, they would be made to suffer. They believed that this criminal element would go to any lengths to 'get square' with any patrolman who 'did not mind his own business.' Decent men in the force asserted that it was not exaggeration to say that a policeman who defied this element in such a way as to become dangerous to it, would place his life in danger." - from The Police Department of the City of New York

      In 1901, an anti-Tammany candidate, Seth Low, was elected Mayor of New York and in January of 1902, he appointed Col. John Partridge to the office of police commissioner, with instructions to clean up the force.

      "For four years there had been a direct, and almost open, alliance between the police and the criminal classes. The force was officered largely by men who had benefited by this alliance, and who were prepared to continue it. The honest men on the force had been overawed into indirect participation in 'the system,' or at least into submission. To do so would have invited quick reprisals. The most corrupt men in the force were its officers; the honest men were subordinates...Every member of the force was dragged into active or passive connivance and the morale of the entire force destroyed. Patrolmen who were not pliable were transferred to precincts where they 'could do no harm,' and for $25 or $50 a patrolman could secure transfer to a precinct near his home." - from The Police Department of the City of New York

      Commissioner Partridge failed completely in his task and resigned one year after he was appointed. But not before dismissing around ninety patrolmen from the police force, including Luke J. Cashman.

      "It was also a common experience for sergeants and roundsmen to make complaints against men who had either no influential friends or who 'made trouble.' This 'trouble' consisted in arresting for violations of the law, men and women who were paying for 'protection.' The men on the force were expected not to run counter to 'the system'; if they did they were either transferred far from their homes or dismissed or disciplined on trumped-up charges. A special point was also made against patrolmen who would not pay assessments or make presents to their superior officers." - from The Police Department of the City of New York

      One cannot help but to speculate about why Luke J. Cashman was dismissed from the police force. If we are to take the record at face value, it is because he assaulted a fellow patrolman over a "personal matter." Was this personal matter something involving his wife or his family? Or was this assault a trumped-up charge used to get rid of Cashman because he was "making trouble" for the corrupt powers-that-be?

      Unfortunately, currently available sources, do not provide an answer to this question, but they do paint quite an interesting picture of what Luke's experience may have been as a NYC policeman from 1878-1902.
      Source: The Police Department of the City of New York: A Statement of Facts, City Club of New York, 1903
    • (Research):THE CITY RECORD Thursday, September 27, 1900 page 5838 POLICE DEPARTMENT At a meeting of the Police Board of the Police Department of The City of New York, held on the 14th day of September, 100.The Chief of Police Patrolman Luke J. Cashman, from Twenty-fourth Precinct to Thirty-first Precinct. [The 24th Precinct is at 151 West 100th Street in the Upper West Side of Manhattan. The 31st Precinct is no longer extant.] (There were mentions of other Cashmans in this report: a firefighter named John J. Cashman, a patrolman named William E. Cashman 74th Prec. to 72nd Prec., a fire dept employee named Edward J. Cashman.) ============================================================== The City of New York LAW DEPARTMENT REPORT for YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1905. John J. Delany, Corporation Counsel NEW YORK: MARTIN B. BROWN COMPANY, PRINTERS AND STATIONERS, Nos. 49 to 57 Park Place. 1906. --- Schedule 1. CERTIORARI AND MANDAMUS. page 588 Court.=Supreme, Kings Co. Register and Folio.=35/235 When Commenced.=July 14, 1902 Title of Action.=Cashman, Luke J. (ex rel.), vs. John N. Partirdge, etc.. Nature of Action.=Certiorari to review dismissal from Police Department. --- Schedule 3. REPORT OF COURT WORK DURING THE QUARTER-TRIALS, ARGUMENTS OF APPEALS AND MOTIONS, REFERENCES, HEARINGS BEFORE COMMISSIONERS, ETC. Court of Appeals page 662 Register and Folio.=35/235 TItle of Action.=People ex rel. Luke J. Cashman vs. J. N. Partridge Nature of Action.=Certiorari to review dismissal from Police Department Disposition.=Argued; decision reserved. J. D. Bell for the City. "Determination affirmed with costs." --- Schedule 4. JUDGMENTS, ORDERS AND DECREES ENTERED. Judgments Entered in Favor of the City During the Year Page 714 Register and Folio= 35 / 235 Judgment Debtor.= Luke J. Cashman Judgment Creditor.= J. N. Partridge Cause of Action.= Certiorari to review dismissal from Police Department Amount.= $66.60 ============================================================== THE POLICE DEPARTMENT OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK: A Statement of Facts Published by The City Club of New York, October, 1903 APPENDIX I STATEMENT SHOWING THE MEN DISMISSED FROM THE FORCE DURING THE YEAR 1902, THE CHARGE UPON WHICH THEY WERE DISMISSED, THE DATES OF DISMISSAL AND CERTIORARI, ETC. page 81 Rank=Patrolman Name=Luke J. Cashman Precinct=15 Date of Complaint=June 11 Date Dismissed Force=July 8 Nature of Complaint=Assaulted Patrolman Williams Date Certiorari=Aug. 7 Status Certiorari=Pending ============================================================== REPORTS OF CASES HEARD AND DETERMINED IN THE APPELLATE DIVISION OF THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK. VOLUME CVI. 1905 Publshed J. B. Lyon Company, Albany, N.Y. --- DECISIONS IN CASES NOT REPORTED. THIRD DEPARTMENT, JUNE, 1905 [VOL. 106] page 614 The People of the State of New York ex rel. Luke J. Cashman, Relator, v. John N. Partridge, as Police Commissioner of the City of New York, Respondent. - Determination confirmed with costs. No opinion. Hirschberg, P. J., Bartlett, Woodward and Rich, JJ., concurred; Jenks, J., dissented. ==============================================================
      The NYC death index listed a Luke Cashman who died on 19 Aug 1952 so I mailed a request for the death certificate to the NYC Office of Vital Records in the Department of Public Health and Mental Hygiene in October 2019. It arrived on 15 Feb 2020 but it might not be for the right Luke Cashman. The listed birthplace [Ireland], marital state [single] and name of father [Luke Cashman] are all incorrect. But, the informant was not a family member, it was an administrator at the Hall of Records at Bellevue Hospital. If Luke died without friends or family nearby, there wouldn't have been anyone who could provide his correct data.
    • (Medical):He was in good health at age 24.

    Father CASHMAN, James,   b. 2 Feb 1820, Pluckanes North, Donaghmore, Co. Cork, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Sep 1879, Hanover, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years) 
    Mother LONG, Catherine,   b. 1820,   d. 12 Apr 1892, Rockland, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Married 3 Sep 1844  , Aghabullogue, Co. Cork, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 

    Spouse MCKENNA, Mary F.,   b. Oct 1879, , , New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Dec 1909, Bronx, New York, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 30 years) 
    Married 27 Oct 1897  Bronx, New York, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 6
    • On 27 October 1897, 31 year-old, Luke Cashman married 18 year-old Mary F. McKenna. Mary's sister, Margaret, was a witness along with Maurice Ryan. The ceremony was performed by the Right Rev. Alexius Edelbrock, O. S. B., a German priest and Abbot of St. Anselm's Priory.
      ====================================================================
      Alexius Edelbrock, the German Catholic priest that married Luke and Mary, after leaving Minnesota in 1889, found a patron in Archbishop Corrigan of New York, who gave him land for a parish that could become a monastic foundation with the provision that Saint John's Abbey also accept responsibility for a Catholic mission to the Bahama Islands. The new abbot, Bernard, wanted nothing to do with responsibility for the Bahamas but he was generous in supporting his predecessor and supplying priests for the new parish, St. Anselm's, which would be swallowed up in the South Bronx in Alexius's lifetime. There Alexius proceeded to build a cavernous four story rectory large enough to serve as the residence for a new monastic community and planned a large church in the Byzantine style. Only the basement of the church was built before his death in 1908. The church was completed in 1916 and is cited in the November 5, 2009 New York Review of Books as "one of the finest examples of the medieval revival in America" (43). Alexius would not be surprised at the compliment. He always thought big.
    Children 
     1. CASHMAN, Arthur L.,   b. 20 Sep 1898, Bronx, Bronx, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Sep 1898, Bronx, Bronx, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 5 Jul 1866 - Hanover, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - Address:
    corner of Pleasant and Park Streets
    South Weymouth, Massachusetts
    USA - 6 Aug 1866 - Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA
    Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 27 Oct 1897 - Bronx, New York, New York, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChild - CASHMAN, Arthur L. - 20 Sep 1898 - Bronx, Bronx, New York, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    072 1900c 67th Street Patrolmen Going On Duty
    072 1900c 67th Street Patrolmen Going On Duty
    PATROLMEN GOING ON PATROL DUTY. (SIXTY-SEVENTH STREET POLICE STATION.) Luke was assigned to this station house in September 1900. He would have worn this type of uniform. [Photo credit: "The police department of the city of New York" by the City Club of New York, October, 1903, accessed via Google Books]
    072 1900 17th Precinct NYPD was 24th
    072 1900 17th Precinct NYPD was 24th
    This building was the home of the 24th Precinct in 1900. It is located in midtown Manhattan at 17 East 51st Street. Luke Cashman was assigned here for a period which ended in September 1900. [Photo credit: "The police department of the city of New York" by the City Club of New York, October, 1903, accessed via Google Books]
    072 1900 19th Precinct NYD was 31st
    072 1900 19th Precinct NYD was 31st
    This building was the home of the 31st Precinct in 1900. It is located on the Upper East Side at 153 East 67th Street. Luke Cashman was transferred to this house in September of 1900. [Photo credit: "The police department of the city of New York" by the City Club of New York, October, 1903, accessed via Google Books]

    Videos
    019 2016 Cross Street Presentation video
    019 2016 Cross Street Presentation video
    This presentation uses maps, plans, photos and other historical documents to track the comings and goings of Cashmans on Cross Street in West Quincy from 1872 to 1930. It also shows what the area looks like today. It focuses primarily on the family of John Cashman & Hannah Falvey and the family of William Cashman & Mary F. Murphy.

    This presentation was developed for the Cashman Family History Luncheon that was held on September 28, 2016.

    Business
    006 1884 Hanover annual Report
    006 1884 Hanover Annual Report
    [1884 Hanover Annual Report]: The Town of Hanover paid Catherine Cashman $31.33 for repairs on highways and $20.67 for new roads on Spring Street. Charles Smith paid Catherine Cashman $36.00 for rent of house. The Town of Hanover paid Luke Cashman $1.50 for shoveling snow.
    006 1886 Hanover Annual Report
    006 1886 Hanover Annual Report
    [1886 Hanover Annual Report for Year Ending Dec 31]: The Town of Hanover paid Luke Cashman $23.17 for repairs on highways.
    006 1887 Hanover Annual Report
    006 1887 Hanover Annual Report
    [1887 Hanover Annual Report for Year Ending Dec 31]: The Town of Hanover paid Catherine Cashman $28.30, James T. Cashman $2.00, and Luke J. Cashman $32.00 for labor and gravel on highways. The Town of Hanover paid James T. Cashman $1.00 and Luke J. Cashman $1.00 for clearing streets of snow. J.T. Hammond and Family paid Catherine Cashman $24.00 for house rent. Charles Smith paid Catherine Cashman $48.00 for house rent in 1887.

    Census
    006 1870 US Census James Cashman household
    006 1870 US Census James Cashman household
    [1870 US Census MA - Hanover - James Cashman household]: In the 1870 U.S. Census, the James Cashman family resided in Hanover, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. The James Cashman household included:    * James Cashman -- 50, male, shoemaker, real estate valued at $1500, born Ireland    *   Catherine Cashman -- 45, female, keeping house, born Ireland    *   John Cashman -- 21, male, farm laborer, born Mass[sic]    *   Dennis Cashman -- 18, male, farm laborer, born Mass  *   Catherine E. Cashman -- 16, female, at home, born Mass, attended school within year    *   Jane[sic] Cashman -- 14, female[sic], at school, born Mass, attended school within year    *   Wm Cashman -- 10, male, at school, born Mass, attended school within year    * Ellen Cashman -- 8, female, at school, born Mass, attended school within year    *   Luke Cashman -- 4, male, at home, born Mass   All members of household were listed as having parents of foreign birth.  All members of household were listed as being able to read and write.
    072 1905 NY state census Minnie Cashman household
    072 1905 NY state census Minnie Cashman household
    In 1905, Luke, age 38, and his wife "Minnie," age 25, are living at 950 East 149th Street in Manhattan. Minnie's sister Margaret McKenna, age 22, and brother Francis McKenna, age 20, live with them. Minnie's occupation is "housework," Luke's is "construction foreman," Francis' is "piano tuner."
    254 1900 US Census Ella McKenna household
    254 1900 US Census Ella McKenna household
    Luke Cashman and Mary McKenna, married just 3 years, are living with Mary's mother, sister and brother at 950 East 149th Street in New York City.

    News
    072 1902 Patrolman Cashman Dismissed detail
    072 1902 Patrolman Cashman Dismissed detail
    This article appeared on page 6 of the New York Tribune on 9 Jul 1902.

    Vital Records
    072 1897 Cashman McKenna marriage record
    072 1897 Cashman McKenna marriage record
    STATE OF NEW YORK. -- Certificate # 16261 -- I hereby certify, that Luke J. Cashman and Mary F. McKenna were joined in Marriage by me in accordance with the laws of the State of New York, in the City of New York, this 27 day of Oct, 1897. Witnesses: Maurice Ryan and Margaret McKenna. Ceremony performed by Alexius Edelbrock.
    072 1897 Marriage signatures
    072 1897 Marriage signatures

  • Sources 
    1. [S479] Massachusetts - Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston at NEHGS, Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, (AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2019), Volume: St. Bridget (Abington) Confirmations, 1870-1920 Page(s): 11 (Reliability: 3), 29 Jun 2020.
      006 1877 Luke Cashman confirmation resgister
      006 1877 Luke Cashman confirmation resgister
      Luke John Cashman was confirmed in Saint Bridget's Church, Abington, MA, on October 18, 1877, by the Most Reverent John J. Williams, Archbishop of Boston.


    2. [S191] Massachusetts - Births, 1841-1915 on FamilySearch.org, FamilySearch.org, (http://FamilySearch.org), Luke J. Cashman, 5 Jul 1866, page 12 (Reliability: 3).
      006 1866 Luke Cashman birth register
      006 1866 Luke Cashman birth register
      BIRTHS REGISTERED in the Town of Hanover for the Year 1866 – No. 13, 5 Jul 1866, Luke J. Cashman, male, born in Hanover to James Cashman and Catherine Long of Hanover. Father is a laborer born in Ireland. Mother was born in Ireland.


    3. [S479] Massachusetts - Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston at NEHGS, Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, (AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2019), Volume: St. Francis Xavier (Weymouth) Baptisms and Marriages, 1866-1869 Page: 1 of 102 (Reliability: 3), 29 Jun 2020.
      006 1866 Luke Cashman baptism register
      006 1866 Luke Cashman baptism register
      Weymouth Baptismal Record 1866
      August 6th - Luke born 5th[sic] of James Cashman & Catherine Long
      Sps. John & Annie Spence
      J. Hannigan


    4. [S4] 1900 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.), Year: 1900; Census Place: Bronx, New York, New York; Roll : T623_1125; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 995. (Reliability: 3).

    5. [S4] 1900 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.), Year: 1900; Census Place: Bronx, New York, New York; Roll : T623_1125; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 995. (Reliability: 3).
      254 1900 US Census Ella McKenna household
      254 1900 US Census Ella McKenna household
      Luke Cashman and Mary McKenna, married just 3 years, are living with Mary's mother, sister and brother at 950 East 149th Street in New York City.


    6. [S38] New York, New York Co., City of New York - Marriage Certificates, certificate # 16261; registered 28 Oct 1897 (Reliability: 3).
      072 1897 Cashman McKenna marriage record
      072 1897 Cashman McKenna marriage record
      STATE OF NEW YORK. -- Certificate # 16261 -- I hereby certify, that Luke J. Cashman and Mary F. McKenna were joined in Marriage by me in accordance with the laws of the State of New York, in the City of New York, this 27 day of Oct, 1897. Witnesses: Maurice Ryan and Margaret McKenna. Ceremony performed by Alexius Edelbrock.
      072 1897 Marriage signatures
      072 1897 Marriage signatures