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004 1926 William F Cashman Fire
004 1926 William F Cashman Fire
Boston Daily Globe - Quincy - Spectacular Blaze as Quincy Garage Burns -- A spectacular fire shortly after midnight this morning gutted the private garage of William Cashman, at 117 Cross st, West Quincy, and alarmed the whole neighborhood. A quantity of burning oil and gasoline made flames which shot high into the air and were visible for miles. Cashman's house, next to the garage, was threatened for a time but the firemen by the use of chemicals extinguished the oil fire and saved the house. The damage, which includes a car destroyed with the garage, is estimated at about $2500. 
 
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004 1926 William F Cashman Fire detail
004 1926 William F Cashman Fire detail
Boston Daily Globe - Quincy - Spectacular Blaze as Quincy Garage Burns -- A spectacular fire shortly after midnight this morning gutted the private garage of William Cashman, at 117 Cross st, West Quincy, and alarmed the whole neighborhood. A quantity of burning oil and gasoline made flames which shot high into the air and were visible for miles. Cashman's house, next to the garage, was threatened for a time but the firemen by the use of chemicals extinguished the oil fire and saved the house. The damage, which includes a car destroyed with the garage, is estimated at about $2500. 
 
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004 1926 William F Cashman Garage Fire
004 1926 William F Cashman Garage Fire
This article was published in the Boston Daily Globe on 28 Jul 1926. It is about a fire that occurred and destroyed William F. Cashman's garage on 117 Cross, St., in Quincy, MA. 
 
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004 1946 William F Cashman Real Estate Board
004 1946 William F Cashman Real Estate Board
This article was published in the Boston Globe on 28 Apr 1946. William F. Cashman is mentioned as an Officer of the Plymouth board in the second column. 
 
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004 1948 Cashman Not Elected Assessor detail
004 1948 Cashman Not Elected Assessor detail
This article was published in the Daily Boston Globe on 9 Mar 1948. It mentions William F. Cashman and states that he does not receive the position as Assessor. 
 
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004 1948 Cashman Not Elected Scituate Assessor
004 1948 Cashman Not Elected Scituate Assessor
This article was published in the Daily Boston Globe on 9 Mar 1948. 
 
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004 1950s Robert Cashman MMA article
004 1950s Robert Cashman MMA article
"Old Cash", the original "Mr. Quincy" arrived at M.M.A in a blaze of glory. He won many friends with his quick humor and the bottle of "handy brandy" he kept in his locker. Things ran pretty smooth for the South Quincy Terror until one night around midnight he started to tear up the quarter-deck and had to be put in his place by Mr.Hirst. This didn't phase our dauntless hero in the least and he soon went on to new and bigger things. For the sake of humor, Uncle Bob organized M.M.A.'s own National Guard Unit and trained them for combat against Sid. We think it proper to mention a little bit concerning cruise time. Many was the night Old Cash could be seen partaking of a little of "this and that" with his friends south of the border. To sum this up, we would like to say that Cash is a true sailor in every meaning of the word and his seamanship ability won him the respect of the officers and his shipmates. 
 
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004 1954 William F Cashman PL funeral
004 1954 William F Cashman PL funeral
William F. Cashman's Obituary from the Patriot Ledger on November 3, 1954. 
 
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004 1954 William F Cashman PL funeral detail
004 1954 William F Cashman PL funeral detail
SCITUATE Nov 3 Patriot Ledger--A high mass of requiem was celebrated yesterday morning at St. Mary's Church, West Quincy, for William F. Cashman, 52, of 18 Beaver Dam Road, Scituate. Mr. Cashman, who was in the real estate business in Scituate, died Thursday at an out-of-town hospital after a long illness. Celebrant of the mass was the Rev. Antonio Cintolo. Seated within the sanctuary was the Rev. John Mullarkey. The music was under the direction of Mrs. Albery Dillon, organist. The funeral left the Sweeney Funeral Home, 54 Elm Street, Quincy, and burial was in St. Mary's Cemetery, West Quincy, where committal prayers were read by the Rev. Cornelius J. Donovan and the Rev. Fr. Mullarkey. Bearers were Tedo Gaudiano, Gerald Hughes Sr., Gerald Hughes Jr., Robert Greer, Gene Cummings and John Craven. Born in Quincy, Mr. Cashman moved to Scituate 15 years ago. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Alice M. (Shea) Cashman; two sons, John M. of Dorchester and Robert W. of the home address; a daughter, Miss Mary Louise Cashman, also of the home address, and two grandchildren. 
 
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004 1954 William F Cashman PL obituary
004 1954 William F Cashman PL obituary
William F. Cashman's Obituary from the Patriot Ledger on Saturday October 30, 1954. 
 
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004 1954 William F Cashman PL obituary detail
004 1954 William F Cashman PL obituary detail
SCITUATE, Oct 30 Patriot Ledger - William F. Cashman, 52, of 18 Beaver Dam Road died Thursday at an out-of-town hospital after a long illness. Mr. Cashman was in the real estate business in this town. He was the husband of Mrs. Alice M. (Shea) Cashman. Born in Quincy, he lived in Scituate for the past 15 years. In addition to his wife, Mr. Cashman leaves two sons, John M. of Dorchester and Robert W. of the home address; a daughter, Miss Mary Louise Cashman, also of the home address, and two grandchildren. A high mass of requiem will be celebrated Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Mary's Church, West Quincy. The funeral will leave the Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 Elm Street, Quincy, and burial will be in St. Mary's Cemetery, West Quincy. Visiting hours at the funeral home will be afternoons and evenings tomorrow and Monday only. 
 
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005 1891 William Cashman new house
005 1891 William Cashman new house
Mr. William Cashman, brother of Mr. John Cashman has his new house on Cross street completed and ready for occupancy. It is the most modern house in West Quincy and contains all the new improvements. It is lighted by electricity and heated by steam, also has set tubs and bath rooms. The house is very handsomely finished throughout. Mr. Cashman was married at Scituate, Wednesday morning, and will occupy his house after a short wedding tour. Among those present at the wedding from this place were Mr. James White, Jr., and Mr. Robert Teasdale. –Enterprise. 
 
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005 1893 William Cashman injury detail
005 1893 William Cashman injury detail
Quincy Patriot - William Cashman met with a serious if not fatal accident Tuesday afternoon. He was superintending a blast which he fired and then got behind a rock to shield himself. The force of the blast threw the rock over onto him injuring his spine and arm and it is thought also injuring him internally. He was taken to his home on Cross street and Dr. Shehan summoned who pronounced his injuries of a very serious nature. [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1891-Dec 1893; 20 May 1893; page 2] 
 
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005 1918 William Cashman death article
005 1918 William Cashman death article
Patriot Ledger 24 Apr, 1918 - Death Quincy Business Man. Death This Morning of William Cashman of West Quincy After Brief Illness. William Cashman, a well known West Quincy business man died this morning at his home of pneumonia following a few days illness. Mr. Cashman had but recently returned from a southern trip when he took cold. His cold developed into pneumonia. Mr. Cashman some years ago entered into the retail coal business at West Quincy, his yards being located on Furnace Brook avenue, his product being received from the mines by rail. He soon built up a large business and had a fine plant. He is survived by his widow and two sons, Edward and William, Jr. 
 
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005 1918 William Cashman obituary
005 1918 William Cashman obituary
Patriot Ledger 24 Apr, 1918 - Death Quincy Business Man. Death This Morning of William Cashman of West Quincy After Brief Illness. William Cashman, a well known West Quincy business man died this morning at his home of pneumonia following a few days illness. Mr. Cashman had but recently returned from a southern trip when he took cold. His cold developed into pneumonia. Mr. Cashman some years ago entered into the retail coal business at West Quincy, his yards being located on Furnace Brook avenue, his product being received from the mines by rail. He soon built up a large business and had a fine plant. He is survived by his widow and two sons, Edward and William, Jr. 
 
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005 1921 Edward L Cashman Bad Fire Scare
005 1921 Edward L Cashman Bad Fire Scare
This article was published in the Quincy Patriot - Quincy Daily Ledger on 3 Sep 1921. It is about a fire that destroyed $2000 worth of hay belonging to Edward Leo Cashman. 
 
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005 1921 Edward L Cashman Bad Fire Scare detail
005 1921 Edward L Cashman Bad Fire Scare detail
QUINCY GIVEN BAD FIRE SCARE -- Cashman's Big Storehouse on Furnace Avenue Threatened When His Hay Sheds are Burned. Loss is Estimated at $2,000- A two-alarm fire threatened the Cashman storage houses and big barn off Cross street, near the Granite Branch of the New Haven railroad last night. The fire started in that part of the sheds used for the storage of hay. In the building were 20 tons of hay. A few minutes after the fire was discovered the flames were shooting upwards for 20 feet. The first alarm came from box 432 at 10:45 and 10 minutes later Chief Mead ordered a second alarm sounded. This was done to get pumping engines and more men, for Chief Mead realized that if the fire broke through the hay sheds and got into the next shed beyond there were 20,000 bags of charcoal which would have made a blaring fire. The West Quincy companies were at the first a few minutes after the alarm sounded, but the pressure from the hydrant streams was not powerful enough to cope with the burning flames. One company had come from the central station on the first alarm and the second alarm brought two more companies from that station also Engine 2 from Quincy Point, Auto Combination 2 of Wollaston and Auto Ladder 2 from Wollaston. Within a few minutes after the pumping engines got to work the flames were beaten down and the firemen were able to get inside the shed where the hay was stored. It was almost unbearably hot in there but the firemen carried lines with them and soon had the fire under control, so that all danger of the flames spreading to the adjacent buildings was gone by. The 20 tons of baled hay were pitched out into the barn yard by the firemen. In an adjoining big barn were eight horses but they were gotten out soon after the fire was discovered and at no time were they in danger. Chief Mead and his men did a good piece of work in confining the flames to the building in which it started. The sounding of the second alarm sent hundreds of automobiles in the direction of West Quincy and thousands of people in West Quincy walked to the fire. The buildings were erected several years ago by the late John Cashman. At the present time they are owned by his nephew, Edward Cashman. Mr. Cashman said he thought the damage to the buildings by fire would not go over $1500 or $2000. All of the 20 tons of hay were ruined either by fire, smoke or water. It was stated that the hay was $32 a ton, which would bring the loss on the contents of the shed up $640. After the sounding of the second alarm, the police auto patrol, equipped with pulmotors and search lights was sent to the scene of the fire by Capt, E.H. Bishop, in charge of the police headquarters at the time. Within minutes after the sounding of the second alarm all sorts of wild rumors were being circulated in City square, which caused a big exodus towards West Quincy of autos and street cars. The all-out signal was sounded at 12:20 this morning. (Source detail: Quincy Patriot - Quincy Daily Ledger, 3 Sep 1921) 
 
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005 1925 Mary Murphy Funeral
005 1925 Mary Murphy Funeral
This article was published in the Daily Boston Globe on 2 Apr 1925. The section outlined in red is about Mary Frances Murphy's funeral. 
 
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005 1925 Mary Murphy Funeral detail
005 1925 Mary Murphy Funeral detail
Boston Daily Globe -- The funeral of Mrs. Mary F. Cashman, widow of William Cashman, and sister of Edward F. Murphy, formerly public works commissioner of Boston, took place this morning from her home, 117 Cross st, West Quincy. A large delegation marched in escort from the home to St. Mary's Church where mass was celebrated at 9:30. The celebrant was Rev William T. O'Connor, the pastor, assisted by Rev. Joseph E. Murphy and Rev Garrett J. Scollard. The musical part of the mass was under direction of Mrs. Mary Mckay Reardon. There were many floral remembrances. Burial was in St. Mary's Cemetery. 
 
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005 1951 Edward L Cashman obituary
005 1951 Edward L Cashman obituary
DEATHS    CASHMAN – Edward L., in Compton, Calif., May 18, son of William and Mary Cashman, late of West Quincy, in his 55th year. Survived by brother William F. of Scituate, Mass. Funeral May 22, from the Morlands Mortuary, Compton, Calif.   21-lt    Edward L. Cashman The funeral of Edward L. Cashman, 55, formerly of West Quincy, who died suddenly Friday at his home in Compton, Cal., will be held there tomorrow.    Mr. Cashman was the son of the late William, and Mary Cashman of West Quincy. He graduated from Quincy High school and served with the army during World War II. He was in the roofing business and was a member of the Quincy Elks lodge.    He is survived by a brother, William F. Cashman of Beaver Dam road, Scituate Harbor. 
 
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006 1884 Jeremiah Philpott death notice Yarmouth Register
006 1884 Jeremiah Philpott death notice Yarmouth Register
This article appeared in the Yarmouth Register on Saturday, May 3, 1884. It describes the accidental death of Jeremiah Philpott, an employee of Cashman Brothers, stone contractors. Jeremiah Philpott is the only non-family member buried in the Cashman Family plot at Saint Patrick Cemetery in Rockland, MA. 
 
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006 1891 Cashman accident
006 1891 Cashman accident
Quincy Patriot - James Cashman met with a runaway accident Saturday. His harness broke, and his horse becoming unmanageable, collided with another team and he was thrown out. He has been laid up several days. [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1891-Dec 1893; 26 Dec 1891; page 3] 
 
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006 1894 James Cashman death
006 1894 James Cashman death
Mr. James Cashman, who died at Stony Creek, Conn., was brought here for interment. Services being held Monday at the resident of Mr. William Cashman, his brother. [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1894-Dec 1896; 3 Feb 1894; page: 2] 
 
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012 1899 Fire on Bunker Hill
012 1899 Fire on Bunker Hill
Quincy Patriot - The alarm from Box 49, at 1:32 o'clock Sunday morning, was for a fire in an unoccupied house on Bunker Hill avenue owned by Michael Shea. The house was situated in the woods, some way from the street, and the fire was well under way when the department arrived. The nearest hydrant was over 1000 feet away and as it was impossible to drive a hose wagon anywhere near the fire considerable unavoidable delay was experienced in getting water onto the burning building. The only way it was possible to get water to the building was by pulling the hose off the wagon and then dragging it through the woods to the scene of action. Then the building was thoroughly soaked. The loss was $200. The cause was undoubtedly incendiary.

Sunday night at 8:40 another alarm was sounded from Box 49 and it proved to be for a fire in the same house. At this fire a line of hose was laid from a hydrant on Willard street and nearly 2000 feet was required to reach the building. The fire caused an additional loss of about $50.
[Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1897-Dec 1899; 9 Sep 1899; page: 3, "Several Fire Alarms"] 
 
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012 1930 Michael E Shea Ledger obituary
012 1930 Michael E Shea Ledger obituary
Ledger - Hold Funeral Tomorrow For Michael Shea - Services at St. Mary's Church for Former Street Head - Funeral services for Michael E. Shea, for many years superintendent of streets in Quincy, who died Saturday following a long illness, will be held tomorrow morning at the residence, 285 Common street, West Quincy, and will be followed by a requiem high mass at 9 o'clock in St. Mary's church, West Quincy. "Mike" Shea, as he was familiarly known throughout the city, was engaged in the general contracting business and for several years was superintendent of streets, serving under the late Mayor William T. Shea, his brother. The past four years a considerable amount of granolithic [sic] sidewalks were constructed for the city by Mr. Shea. He was the son of William Shea, who was a trooper in the "Light Brigade" of the British Army when it made its memorable attack on the Russian batteries at the battle of Balaklava in the Crimean War. This attack was immortalized by Lord Tennyson in his poem "The Charge of the Light Brigade." All the surviving members of the brigade were decorated with the Victoria Cross by Queen Victoria herself. This trophy was kept for years in the old Shea homestead on Common street, but after the house was damaged by a fire many years ago is disappeared and was never found afterwards. The survivors include the widow, five daughters, Mrs. Catherine Keegan, Mrs. Elias Canfield, Mrs. William Cushman, Miss. Marjorie Shea, and Miss Anna Shea, and by four sisters, Miss Katherine Shea and Mrs. Michael Lyons of West Quincy, Mrs. Arthur D. Murphy of Wollaston and Mrs. Annie Scollard of Braintree. He was a member of the St. Francis Court, M.C.O.F.; Division 22 A.O.H., and Quincy Lodge of Elks. [Source credit: Patriot Ledger, November 10, 1930] 
 
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012 1930 Michael Shea Obituary QPL
012 1930 Michael Shea Obituary QPL
QUINCY PATRIOT LEDGER-Hold Funeral Tomorrow for Michael Shea - Services at St. Mary's Church for Former Street Head. Funeral services for Michael E. Shea, for many years superintendent of streets in Quincy, who died Saturday following a long illness, will be held tomorrow morning at the residence, 285 Common Street, West Quincy, and will be followed by a requiem high mass at 9 o'clock in St. Mary's Church, West Quincy. "Mike" Shea, as he was familiarly known throughout the city, was engaged in the general contracting business and for several years was superintendent of streets, serving under the late Mayor William T. Shea, his brother. The past four years a considerable amount of granolithic sidewalks were constructed for the city by Mr. Shea. He was the son of William Shea, (continued on Page 10, column 3), who was a trooper in the "Light Brigade" of the British Army when it made its memorable attack on the Russian batteries at the battle of Balaklava in the Crimean War. This attack was immortalized by Lord Tennyson in his poem, "The Charge of the Light Brigade." All the surviving members of the brigade were decorated with the Victoria Cross by Queen Victoria herself. This trophy was kept for years in the old Shea homestead on Common street, but after the house was damaged by fire many years ago is disappeared and was never found afterwards. The survivors include the widow, five daughters, Mrs. Catherine Keegan, Mrs. Elias Canfield, Mrs. William Cashman, Miss Marjorie Shea, and Miss Anna Shea, and by four sisters Miss Katherine Shea and Mrs. Michael Lyons of West Quincy. Mrs. Arthur D. Murphy of Wollaston an Mrs. Annie Scollard of Braintree. He was a member of the St. Francis Court, M.C.O.F; Division 22, A.O.H., and Quincy Lodge of Elks. 
 
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013 1897 Danced in New Hall
013 1897 Danced in New Hall
Boston Journal - Danced in New Hall - St. Mary's Hall, West Quincy, the home of the St. Mary's Catholic Total Abstinence Society, which was destroyed by fire last winter, was reopened last night and the even was celebrated by a concert and ball. The new hall is a handsome structure, and is without a doubt the best appointed public hall in the city. The interior of the building was lavishly decorated with American flags, streamers of red, white and blue, and potted plants, palms and ferns. There were 150 couples present. The floor was in charge of Patrick A. Milford, and he was assisted by J.J. Kelly, William Walsh, W.P. Barry, William Dalphie, P. Kelliher, John Boyd and Edward Finn. The Reception Committee consisted of T.D. McGrath, William T. Shea, John H. Ash and John McAloon. 
 
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013 1897 William T Shea Sewer Board
013 1897 William T Shea Sewer Board
 
 
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013 1897 William T Shea Sewer Board detail
013 1897 William T Shea Sewer Board detail
William T. Shea Who has been reappointed a member of the board of Sewer Commissioners for three years, was born in Quincy in 1858. He receved his education in the public schools of the town, leaving which he learned the granite cutting trade. He is now a member of the firm of W. Shea & Son. He represented Ward Four in the City Council during the years 1889 and 1890, serving on the Committee on Streets. He was also for several years manager for the Quincy Paving and Edgestone Co. In 1895 he was appointed by Mayor Hodges as the two-year member of the Board of Sewer Commissioners. He is a member of St. Mary's Catholic Total Abstinence society, the C.T. A.U. of Massachusetts, St. Francis Court of Foresters, and the Knights of Columbus. 
 
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013 1899 Chairman sewer article
013 1899 Chairman sewer article
 
 
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013 1899 Chairman Sewer article detail
013 1899 Chairman Sewer article detail
Chairman Shea of the Sewer Commissioners resents the inference that men in his department were discharged for political reasons, and that men were retained who are not citizens of Quincy. He says, in the first place, none but citizens of Quincy are employed and have not been for several years. In regard to the dropping of men the day after election, he says: The Sewer department are finishing up a connecting link of the sewer on Columbia street, and that about ten days more will be required to complete the job, which will wind up the work for the year and it is unwise to open any more streets. There was likely to be a heavy storm any day and stop work. When asked if this was the case, why it would not be better to keep a large gang of men at work and finish up the job in half the time, than to use a small gang and take ten days to do the job, Mr. Shea said, "The reason is that the soil is wet and it was impossible to work a large gang of men economically, and for that reason some of the men were discharged. It was natural that they should kick. Allowing that Mr. Shea's statements are the true facts of the case, it is rather a queer co-incident that it should have been discovered the day after election that a large force of men could no be worked and that the men discharged are supposed to be those who favored Mr. Hall for Mayor. There was also a wholesale discharge of the employees of the Street department on the Coddington street job and elsewhere, but the Ledger has been unable to find Commissioner Cavanagh at his office. 
 
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013 1899 Danced Till Early Morning
013 1899 Danced Till Early Morning
 
 
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013 1899 Danced Till Early Morning detail
013 1899 Danced Till Early Morning detail
The Boston Globe - They Danced Till Early Morn. - St. Mary's Hall, West Quincy, Crowded at the 18th Annual Ball of St. Francis Court, M.C.O.F. - West Quincy - Dec 30 - St. Mary's hall never had a jollier party than last night, when the 18th annual concert and ball of St. Francis court, M.C.O.F., was held. The ball of this society is always looked forward to as the leading event in Catholic social circles, and last night's affair was a worthy successor to the many brilliant affairs which have been given by St. Francis court. The interior of the hall was decorated with the national colors and the stage was converted into a fern and palm-be-decked bower, from the depths of which an orchestra discoursed entrancing music. From 8 till 9 o'clock a pleasing concert was given by the orchestra and at 9 o'clock the grand march was started. This was led by Chief Ranger William T. Shea and Miss Katherine [sic] Shea. They were followed by many couples, and at the conclusion of the march dancing held full sway till the early hours of the morning. The floor was in charge of William T. Shea, and he was assisted by James P. Dillon, Adam S. Vogel, W.P. Hughes, John F. Burke, James W. Ogle, T.F. Hogan, W.E. Brown, G.H. Ferguson, T.J. Dunphy, M.F. Riley, Edward Finn, James A. White, Edward S. Cole, Joseph L. Heaney, John Vogel, J.F. Goodhue, M.J. Daley, and Charles A. Hayes. Those in charge were: Reception Committee, Dr. J.M. Sheahan, T.J. Foley, Dr. J.H. Ash, W.T. Shea, J.H, Elcock, M.F. Owens, W.D. Burns, Miss E.C. Sheahan, T.F. Mannex, Thomas M. Butler, J.P. Dillon, T.J. Lamb, C.C. Hearn, Peter T. Fallon, Miss Mary Leary; committee of arrangements, William T. Shea, W.P. Hughes, James A. White, James P. Dillon, M.J. Daley, Thomas J. Lamb, A.B. Vogel, John F. Burke, John T. Bryan. 
 
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013 1899 William T Shea article
013 1899 William T Shea article
William T. Shea, the chairman of the Board of Sewerage Commissioners, has been a memeber of that board since 1895. THe first board was composed of Paul R. Blackmur, H.T. Whitman and W.T. Shea. The members of the present board are W.T. Shea, Frederick L. Jones, A.F. Schenkelberger and Engineer, E.W. Branch. The work of this commission is one of the most important the city has undertaken and has been prosecuted with skill and economy. A full report of the work and expenditures to January 1, 1899, may be found on page 195 of City Document No. 10, being the annual report of the city officers for the year 1898. Mr. Shea's connection wth this Commission is especially appropriate; his long experience with such work and the management of men being of the great value in the present enterprise. His experience as a contractor and business man began in 1872, as a partner in the firm of William Shea & Son. His father, who was the senior partner, came to this city in the early '50's and by industry and thrift was enabled in 1872 to establish himself in the quarry and granite manufacturing buissness. He died in 1880 but the old firm name, and the nature of the business has of late years been gradually changed. Mr. W.T. Shea, who still carries on the business, has gone more largely into street building, paving, excavating and general contracting, and has built up a large and successful business. He was born in Quincy, March 24, 1857, and was educated at the public schools. He is known among his associates as a whole-souled fellow. His cheerful disposition and lighted-heartedness conveys the impression that he is free from care, but has a serious side, and in a business proposition can tackle a financial question like an expert. He doesn't hanker for political honors, but has had some experience in that line, having been elected to the first City Council, and re-elected the following year, serving on the Committee on Streets, Ways, Bridges and Lights, and on the Committee Ordinances. He is naturally endowed with a goodly share of brains and capacity, and wherever he has been tried, has not been found wanting in these traits, or the qualities which make a man among men. 
 
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013 1902 William T Shea Catholic Order of Foresters
013 1902 William T Shea Catholic Order of Foresters
This article was published in the Boston Sunday Globe on 22 Jun 1902. It mentions William T Shea and his plans to visit the Quincy courthouse. 
 
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013 1902 William T Shea Order of Foresters detail
013 1902 William T Shea Order of Foresters detail
This article was published in the Boston Sunday Globe on 22 Jun 1902. It mentions William T Shea and his plans to visit the Quincy courthouse. 
 
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013 1907 Mayor Shea Promises to Voters detail
013 1907 Mayor Shea Promises to Voters detail
To the Voters of Quincy:-- As a candidate for Mayor I believe the public have a right to know my views upon the issues of the present municipal campaign. I believe in a radical change from the present method of conducting our city affairs. I believe no contract should be given as a reward for political services. I believe that a contractor should not be influenced by city officials in the subletting of his contract. I believe that every dollar expended by the city should show a dollar's worth in return. I believe that the qualifications demanded in an applicant for officer should be honesty and ability and a willingness to devote his best energies to the service of the city. I believe that every person seeking employment in the city's service should be prepared to offer honest and efficient service. I believe that the head of each administrative department should be held responsible for the success of that department. I believe that no official should be permitted to build up a political machine. I believe that City Hall offices should not be used for political purposes. I believe in strict enforcement of No-License laws. I believe that the high standard of the Quincy schools should be maintained. I believe that all appointments to office should be made irrespective of race, creed or party affiliations. I was born in Quincy and have lived here all my life. All my business interests are in Quincy. I am paying to the working men of Quincy from $50,000-$60,000 a year. I believe that my experience as a Quincy business man qualifies me to administer the affairs of our city in an efficient and business-like manner. Absolutely, I have made no promise nor an intimation of a promise as to whom I shall, if elected, appoint to office. I have made no trades or political deals to secure votes. William T. Shea, 12 Common Street. 
 
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013 1907 Mayor Shea Ward 4 Voter Article
013 1907 Mayor Shea Ward 4 Voter Article
An Article about Mayor Shea found in The Quincy Daily Ledger. The title reads Mayor Elect, Thinks That He May Revise The Slate of Ward 4 Voter. 
 
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013 1907 Mayor Shea Ward 4 Voter Article Detail
013 1907 Mayor Shea Ward 4 Voter Article Detail
Considerable interest was taken in the slate which the Ward Four voter so kindly arranged for Mayor-elect Shea, which was printed in the Daily Ledger yesterday. Some of the names suggested were entirely new to Mr.Shea, as the Daily Ledger found in an interview last evening, and he thought he would have to revise the list some during the next eight weeks. Undoubtedly the hopes of many were raised by the announcement and some who had no idea of entering the field may consider the possibilities. Certainly some very good selections were made for some of the offices if the gentlemen would accept. It was noticed that only three in the list were reappointments. It is possible the change will not be so sweeping. Will the Commissioner of Public Works be C.F. Knowlton, John Cashman, H.T. Whitman, Fred E. Trooper or someone else? 
 
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013 1907 Mayor Sheas promises to voters
013 1907 Mayor Sheas promises to voters
 
 
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013 1907 Shea Municipal Election
013 1907 Shea Municipal Election
Votes at the Municipal Election, December 3, 1907. 
 
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013 1910 Mayor Shea Mother Obituary
013 1910 Mayor Shea Mother Obituary
Obituary Mayor's Mother Passes awayThe Quincy Daily Paper Vol 25 No.227  Mayors mother passes away  Was a proud son and his election to mayoralty  The mother of Mayor Shea who _ hovering between life and death the past few days passed quietly away to rest at 4:30 this A.M. thursday surrounded by her children.   She was about 79 years of age.  . s_ervices will be held for her from – 12 Common.  Sautrday morning at 8:15 will be followed by a __ at St. Mary’s.  _ 3o’clock.  The citizens of Quincy in general sympathize with Mayor Shea in the loss of his mother Mrs Margaret Shea.  Mrs Shea has been in poor health for a number of weeks and while it was known that she  would not recover everything  possible was done to prolong her life.   She  has been very weak for the past few days and her death has been expected every day.  Mrs Shea was the widow of William Shea who came to Quincy in the early 50’s and built up a substantialgranite business.  He died in 1889 and since that time his business has been carried on under the firm name of W. Shea & son.   Her husband was a veteran of the Crimean war and took part in that famous battle known as the charge at Balklava as a member of the immortalized Light Brigade that went into battle against the Russinans with 607 men and by Queen Victoria with the Victorian Cross, the highest badge of honor which the British Empire bestowes upon it’s soliders.  It was shortly after this battle that he came to Quincy.  Mrs Shea was justly proud of her children, and it was for her a happy moment when she sat in the gallery at City Hall three years ago and saw her son inaurated as Mayor of the City of Quincy.  Yet she was no more proud of her children than they were of her, for her comfort and pleasure has always been uppermost in their minds.  She leaves six children, two sons, and four daughters.  They are Hon. W.T. Shea, Mayor of Quincy; Michael E. Shea, foremean of the Street department of the city; Miss Katherine E. Shea, who lived at home with her mother and brother ; Mrs. Mary, wife of Michael Lyons; Mrs. Elizabeth, wife of A.A. Murphy, both of Quincy, and Mrs. Anne, widow of John V. Scollard late of Braintree." 
 
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013 1910 William T Shea Manhunt article
013 1910 William T Shea Manhunt article
Patriot - Granite Manufacturer Kills Two and Wounds 3 Others - Man Hunt Follows Unexplained Frenzy of Prominent Citizen of Quincy, Mass (By Associated Press to the Patriot) Quincy Mass, July 29 - After killing two persons and wounding three others at whom he shot in a unexplained frenzy Louis Restelli, a granite contractor, made his escape late today and tonight was at large. His mother, Mrs. Rose Restelli, 65 years old, and Henry E. Hardwick, aged 56 years, one of the most prominent granite manufacturers in this city, from whom Restelli rented his place of business, are dead. Gasper Restelli, 40 years, brother of Louis, has three bullet wounds in his body and is not expected to live. Benjamin Bishop, also a granite manufacturer, is suffering from two bullet wounds, one in the hand and another in the thigh, and C. Theodore Hardwick, brother of the dead man, and his partner in business, will be crippled for life by a shattered knee pan, the result of one of Restelli's shots. The reason for Restelli's sudden running amuck [sic] was not evident tonight, but it is suggested that money troubles may have caused him to become demented. Tonight he was the object of a man hunt headed by Mayor William T. Shea and participated in by militiamen, policemen, firemen and citizens. Restelli called today at his mothers home in South Quincy, to ask her for a loan which he had sought for several days. Her body was found later in the house, pierced by several bullets. Heading for his brother's place of business Restelli met Bishop, had some words with him and after a struggle fired several shots, two of which took effect. Restelli next went to his brother Gaspar's granite manufacturing establishment, and left him lying on the floor of his office, probably fatally wounded. Taking possession of a horse and buggy Louis drove at an ordinary pace to the office of the Hardwick Company and then fled to the open country. 
 
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013 1912 Quincy Church Party
013 1912 Quincy Church Party
Boston Journal - West Quincy Church To Have Lawn Party - The annual lawn party of St. Mary's parish of West Quincy will be held Saturday afternoon and evening on the grounds surrounding the parochial residence. The event this year will also be a reunion of the members of the parish. The affair is in charge of a general committee, which includes over 300 members of the parish. The executive committee included William T. Shea, Michael Riley, secretary; the Rev. Fr. Henry T. Grady, pastor; and the Rev. William J. Duffy. The various sub-committees are headed by Stephen B. Little, grounds; Michael Riley, music; Common street district, Miss Margaret Farrell and Miss Anna Farrell: West street, Miss Annie C. Galvin: Rogers, Willard and Grove streets district, Miss E.P. Farrell, Miss Annie McGilvary and Miss Lillian Donovan. 
 
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013 1912 William T Shea Candidate
013 1912 William T Shea Candidate
Boston Journal - Ex-Mayor Shea May Be Candidate for Congress - Quincy, July 19 - It is probable that ex-Mayor William T. Shea of this city will be a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the now fourteenth congressional district. Ex-Mayor Shea is known in almost all the cities and towns in the new district and is very popular wherever he is known. Mr. Shea has been elected four times mayor of this city. He said this morning he was considering the proposition to enter the primaries as a candidate, but had not yet fully made up his mind. 
 
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013 1913 All Quincy Mourns For Ex-Mayor Shea
013 1913 All Quincy Mourns For Ex-Mayor Shea
0013-51 1913 William T Shea obit Quincy Daily Ledger 
 
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013 1913 Mayor Shea Quincy Ledger Funeral
013 1913 Mayor Shea Quincy Ledger Funeral
Notable Funeral Ex-Mayor Shea. Solemn High Mass of Requiem Largely Attended by City Officials and Citizens. Floral Tributes Exceeded Anything Ever Seen in This City. Hon. William T. Shea, the only Mayor of Quincy ever elected four consecutive terms, was tenderly honored in death this morning by her citizens. All denominations and creeds were at his funeral which was held from his home at 279 Common street. An escort of nearly 300 preceded the hearse and over 500 were in the procession. St. Mary's church, where a solemn high requiem mass was celebrated was completely filled and among those present were many out of town friends as well as Quincy people. As the funeral left the home, the age of the honored gentlemen was tolled in the fire alarm signals and City Hall, o'er [sic] which a flag hung at half mast was closed also other places of business. Headed by a platoon of police under Chief Frank E. Burrel and Captain Daniel R. McKay, the long line travelled [sic] over Common street to Copeland to Crescent to the church entrance. There the escort divided and the casket and its remains were carried between the lines. Rev. Fr. Thomas R. McCoy, pastor or St. Mary's church, was celebrant of the mass. Rev. Fr. Henry T. Grady formerly pastor, now of St. Joseph's church of Somerville, was deacon, and Rev. Fr. John P. Cuffe pastor of the Sacred Heart church of Atlantic, was sub deacon. Rev. Fr. William J. Duffy, curate at St. Mary's church, was master of ceremonies. Seated within the chancel were Monsignor Ambrose F. Roche of Watertown, Rev. Fr. John J. Power of Cambridge and Rev Fr. John L. Callahan of Waltham, former curate at St. Mary's church; Rev. Fr. James McNiff of Atlantic, Rev. Fr. William T. Deasey of Randolph, Rev Fr. Francis Walsh of Reading. Music for the mass was the Gregorian chant, under the direction of Miss Fannie Cronin, by the regular choir. Miss Alice Foley, soloist rendered De Profundis and Pie Jesu. The bearers were James H. Elcock representing St. Francis court, M.C.O.F.; Peter Gilraine of Div. 22, A.O.H; Lewis J. White and John F Walsh of the Quincy lodge, B.P.O.E and John W. McAnarney and Timothy J. Carey of Quincy council, Knights of Columbus. The escort included Mayor Eugene R. Stone, President Joseph L. Whiton of the city council and practically all officials of the entire city government. Hon. Russel A. Sears, Hon. Henry O. Fairbanks and Hon. John O. Hall, three ex-mayors were present. The latter, with George F. Pinkham, Herbet T.Whitman and John C. Kapple represented the first city council of the city to which Mayor Shea was elected from Ward four. Large delegations from St. Francis Court, M.C.O.F., Quincy Council, Knights of Columbus, Div. 22, A.O.H. and Quincy lodge, B.P.O.E and the Holy Name Society of St. Mary's parish. Before the body was taken from the house the ritual of the Elks was read by Chaplain Charles Gould assisted by Exalted Ruler Phillip T. Sullivan and the officers. Music during the service was by the Temple quartette. Quincy Board of Trade was represented by President John L. Hamilton, Walter E. Piper, Frank F. Crane. There was a general attendance of the merchants of the city. The Granite Manufacturers Association was represented by its secretary, Thomas J. Dunphy and Secretary Charles Daley of Medford was the delegate of the Middlesex County Branch of the Federation of the Catholic Societies and Parishes. Others present were Hon. J. Edward Barry, mayor of Cambridge, Edward T. Quinley and John L. Holt, superintendent and chief clerk respectively of the street department of that city. Daniel H. McGuire, high secretary treasurer and Joseph T. Brennan, high senior conductor of the M.C.O.F. Hon. William S. McNarey, Edwin M. of Rockland, state deputy commissioner of probation; Samuel T. MacQuarrie, of the Fore River Ship building Corporation; John T. Conway and Thomas L. Gammons of the Bay Sate Street Railway Co., Senator-elect Louis F. R. Langelier, A. F. Bromley of the Y.M.C.A. Charles Knowlton and Thomas F. Burke former Commissioner of the Public Works of Quincy. The ushers at the church were Robert J. Teasdale, John Connelle, M. Vincent Reardon, Edward T. Monahan, John A. Duggan, W. Henry Donaher, Charles J. McGivray and William A. Carey. An air of sadness pervaded the home of ex-Mayor Shea and the church and even after the remains has been interred in the family lot in West Quincy beside his parents, for whom his love and affections never waned, hundreds stood about the grave expressing their deep respect and eloquent love for their genial friend and comrade, "Bill Shea." There was no pronounced eulogy but the tributes of friends, many from early childhood were affecting. Even those friends of his mature years stood by as earth gradually covered the casket and sorrowfully bowed their heads with those who survive him. But a short distance from the grave stood Dennis Meuse, one of the few remaining Indians of the Mic Mac tribe who became a registered citizen so that he could cast his vote for "Bill Shea" for mayor, and surrounding him were little children who gazed with wondering eyes on the large framed weeping American Indian who was not as devoid of sentiment as the suposed [sic.] Many and handsome were the florid tributes and none were more significant than the representation of the Mayor's chair from the Hebrews of the city. The pieces were carried from the house to the grave in an open barouche. Among the remembrances were: Among the floral tributes were: St. Mary's C.T.A. & M.R. Society, - standing cross. St. Francis court, M.C.O.F. - pillow of lillies, roses, and ferns, marked "Brother." Quincy council K of C.,-standing cross. Quincy lodge, B.P.O. Elks, - standing roses. Granite City Club, - wreath of roses. Paving Cutters, - broken column of ivy and violets. Street Department of City, - gates ajar. Lady clerks at City Hall, - bouquet of roses. Quincy Board of Trade, - wreath of roses. Granite Trust Co., - wreath of roses and ivy. City Council, - wreath of roses. Police Department, - wreath of roses. Hebrews of Quincy, - vacant chair. Washington French Hose Co. - wreath of Killarney roses. Municipal Dock Commission, - spray of pinks and roses. His Appointees at City Hall, - standing crescent and sickle. Quincy Yacht Club, - wreath of roses. Rev. H.T. Grady, - Richmond roses and orchids. Rev J.P. Cuffe, - Richmond roses and ivy. Mayor Eugene R. Stone, - wreath of Killarney roses. Ex-congressman and Mrs. Wm. S. McNary, - spray of roses and ivy and violets. President and Mrs. J.L. Whiton, - spray of pinks and roses. City Solicitor J.W. McAnarney, - standing cross. Ex Mayor and Mrs. Charles M. Bryant, - spray of pinks and roses. Granite Manufacturers Association, - standing wreath and anchor. City Physician and Mrs. J.H. Ash, - wreath of roses. City Clerk and Mrs. E.L. Crane, - spray of roses. Chief Assessor and Mrs. W. W. Adams, - spray of roses. Sealer of Weights and Measurers, J M. Cantfill, - cross of roses. Overseer of Poor and Mrs. J. H. Elcock, - wreath of pinks. Dr. George M. Sheahan, - wreath of pinks. Mrs. J. M. Sheahan, - wreath of pinks. W.H. Cobb, - wreath of pinks. Mr. and Mrs. E.J. Murphy, - wreath of pinks. Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Carey, - wreath of roses. Mr. James Dillon and family, - wreath of pinks. Mr. Bernard Donaher and family, - wreath of pinks. Cousins Lou., George and Gladys,- standing cross. H.F. Doble and family, - wreath of pinks and roses. Mr. and Mrs. H.F. Loud, - spray of pinks and orchids. Mr. Wm. Loud, - spray of pinks. Mr. P. Malone Sullivan, - spray of pinks. The Walsh family, - wreath of roses. Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Shields, - wreath of Chrysanthemums. Mr. and Mrs. John Cashman, - standing harp. Miss Annie N. English, - bouquet of roses. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis J. White, - wreath of roses. Mr. Fred L. Zoller, - wreath of roses. Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Collins, - spray of roses. John D. Smith, -wreath of roses. Mr and Mrs Edward Finn, - wreath of pinks. Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Coughlin, - wreath of roses. Miss Annie Scollard, - wreath of roses. Mrs. J.F. Burke and Miss Mary Burke, - column of ivy and lilacs. Mr. and Mrs. R.Y. Woodbury, - wreath of roses. Mrs. William Burns and the Misses Burns, - spiritual bouquet. George. W. Holden, - spray of pinks. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph N. Kennedy, - spray of roses. A.H. Dunhan and J.R.S. Ross, -  wreath of roses. William Powers, - plaque of Killarney roses. Mr. and Mrs. William Reardon, - spray of lilies of the valley. Mr. and Mrs. William Cashman, - standing wreath. Dr. and Mrs. J.T. Reynolds, - wreath of roses. Mrs. Annie Connolly and Miss Taff, - wreath of roses. Mr. and Mrs. T.J. Dunphy, -wreath of roses. Mr. and Mrs. J. Derringer, - flat bouquet. Mr. and Mrs. Water McKenzie, - spray of roses. 
 
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013 1913 William T Shea BG Obituary
013 1913 William T Shea BG Obituary
 
 
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013 1913 William T Shea Dies in Quincy
013 1913 William T Shea Dies in Quincy
0013-52 1913 William T Shea Obit The Boston Journal 
 
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013 1913 William T Shea obit Boston Journal
013 1913 William T Shea obit Boston Journal
William T. Shea's Obituary was posted in the Boston Journal on 20 Dec 1913. 
 
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013 1913 William T Shea obit Boston Journal detail
013 1913 William T Shea obit Boston Journal detail
The Boston Journal -- William T. Shea Dies in Quincy -- Was Mayor of the City for Four Years in Succession -- Quincy, Dec 22 -- William T. Shea, for four consecutive years mayor of Quincy, died earlier today at his home, after an illness of three weeks. Former Mayor Shea was one of the most progressive and aggressive executives the city ever had. Two years ago he refused to run again, explaining that his business required his attention and that his health was poor. Mr. Shea was the son of William Shea, a veteran of the Crimean War, whose heroism won him the Victoria Cross. He was born in Quincy in 1857, was educated in the public schools here, and entered the granite business with his father. He is survived by four sisters, Katherine Shea, Mrs. M.E. Lyons, Mrs. Anna Scollard and Mrs. Arthur Murphy, and by one brother, Michael Shea. Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock with a solemn high mass of requiem at St. Mary's Church. The Quincy City Council tonight passed resolutions on the death of ex-Mayor William T. Shea. 
 
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013 1913 William T Shea obit Springfield Daily News
013 1913 William T Shea obit Springfield Daily News
William T. Shea's obituary was posted in the Springfield Daily news on 22 Dec 1913. 
 
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013 1913 William T Shea obit Springfield Daily News detail
013 1913 William T Shea obit Springfield Daily News detail
Springfield Daily News -- Quincy - Dec 22. -- William T. Shea, four times mayor of Quincy, died today after a protracted illness. An attack of indigestion brought the former mayor to his bed two months ago. Heart trouble is said to have been the immediate cause of his death. Shea was born in Quincy, March 24, 1857. His father, William Shea, was a member of the famous Light Brigade, "the gallant 600" immortalized by Tennyson. Shea served as councilman before becoming mayor. He held the office of mayor for four years, longer than any Democrat in the history of the city, but pleaded business and refused to run again two years ago. The granite quarrying and contracting business, started by his father, had grown to such an extent and his health was breaking, causing him to refuse to be a candidate for Congress in 1912. On learning of Shea's death, Mayor Stone ordered the flags on the City Hall and others buildings at half mast today. 
 
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013 1913 William T Shea obituary
013 1913 William T Shea obituary
 
 
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013 1962 Shea memorial rink dedication
013 1962 Shea memorial rink dedication
Newspaper article about the William T. Shea Memorial Skating Rink. Title reads Dedication Of MDC Skating Rink Next Wednesday. 
 
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013 1962 Shea memorial rink dedication detail
013 1962 Shea memorial rink dedication detail
QUINCY - Dedication ceremonies for the Mayor William T. Shea Memorial Skaing Rink in West Quincy will be held next Wednesday at 2 p.m. at the MDC facility in the St. Moritz area. Mrs. John D. Smith of 65 West Street, Quincy; a niece of the late Mayor Shea, will unveil the marker designating the artificial ice skating rink. Officials of the Metropolitan District Commission and other public servants will be present. The rink opens officially Nov. 15. Facilities include warming rooms, concession booth, a large lobby, spectator walk, ticket windows and rest rooms. Legislation for the rink was filed by Rep. Joseph E. Brett and signed in 1961. The rink has been under construction since last spring. 
 
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013 1962 Shea memorial rink opening
013 1962 Shea memorial rink opening
Article found in a newspaper about the Mayor William T. Shea Memorial skating rink. The title of the article reads 300 Attend Dedication Of Mayor Shea Rink. 
 
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013 1962 Shea memorial rink opening detail
013 1962 Shea memorial rink opening detail
QUINCY - The new Mayor William T. Shea Memorial skating rink in the St. Moritz section of the Blue Hills was dedicated yesterday afternoon, with more than 300 persons braving the rain to attend the ceremony. Speakers were Metropolitan District Commissioner Robert F. Murphy, Mayor Amelio Della Chiesa, Sen. Thomas S. Burgin, Rep. James R. McIntyre and Ward Four Counselor George B. McDonald. Rep. Joseph E. Brett who had filed legislation to establish the rink in West Quincy, was master of ceremonies. The flag-raising was conducted by a color detail from the Morrisette Legion Post of West Quincy, headed by Comdr. Paul W. O'Neill. Mrs. John D. Smith of West Quincy unveiled the marker designating the rink as the Mayor William T. Shea Memorial Skating Rink. Mrs. Smith is a niece of the late mayor, who served as chief executive in 1908-1911. Cutting the ribbon was 12-year-old Madeline Cashman, a great grand niece of the late mayor. Miss Joanne Vissa, "Miss Quincy," presented bouquets to Mrs.Smith and Miss Cashman, while she, in turn, was presented with flowers by Comm. Murphy. Others present for the exercises included Rep. Charles L. Shea of Quincy and Herbert B. Hollis of Braintree, City Councilors George G. Burke and James S. McCormack, Quincy Health Commissioner Dr. Richard M. Ash, Munroe MacLean, director of recreation, Kenneth P. Fallon Jr., member of the city's park and recreation board, and David Alexander, commander of the Quincy Veterans Council. Henry Sullivan, chaplain of the Morrisette Post, gave the invocation. In his remarks, Mr.Brett "warned" Commissioner Murphy that the skating rink was only the beginning of plans to develop the St. Moritz area as "the foremost recreational spot in the metropolitan district." He foresaw a swimming pool, tennis, basketball, and handball courts, baseball and football fields, a track, ski trails, toboggan slides, and tiny tot's play areas. The facility will open for skating about Nov. 15. 
 
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014 1946 Mrs Michael Solimando at Symphony
014 1946 Mrs Michael Solimando at Symphony
This article was published in the Boston Globe on 16 Jun 1946. It mentions Mrs. Michael Solimando as a member of the Symphony for the Annual Pops Concert. 
 
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014 1946 Mrs Michael Solimando at Symphony detail
014 1946 Mrs Michael Solimando at Symphony detail
This article was published in the Boston Globe on 16 Jun 1946. It mentions Mrs. Michael Solimando as a member of the Symphony for the Annual Pops Concert. 
 
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At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
 
 
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At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
 
 
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At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
 
 
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014 1960 Michael Solimando Testifies in MDC Inquistition
014 1960 Michael Solimando Testifies in MDC Inquistition
This article was published in the Boston Globe on 15 Oct 1960. It is about the investigation of the Metropolitan District Commission, Michael Solimando testified during the court case. 
 
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017 1906 J E Cashman Leaves for Home BFP detail
017 1906 J E Cashman Leaves for Home BFP detail
The Burlington Free Press - Contractor J.E. Cashman, who has been constructing the new breakwater for the past two season, left Friday morning for his home in Braintree, Mass. This winter he will be employed in Fitchburg, Mass., where he has been awarded a contract. The work of laying abutments of the new breakwater has been kept later than usual this season because of the low water. All work is now closed for the season. 
 
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017 1906 James E Cashman Leaves for Home BFP
017 1906 James E Cashman Leaves for Home BFP
The Burlington Free Press - Thursday, November 26, 1906 - page 5. 
 
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017 1910 James Cashman Alleged Assault BFP detail
017 1910 James Cashman Alleged Assault BFP detail
The Burlington Free Press - James E. Cashman, the contractor, was fined $20 and costs of $9.00 by Judge Mower in the city court Monday on a plea of nolo contendere [sic] in an action brought by the State against Cashman in which assault is charged. Mr. Cashman entered into an argument with M.A. Sawyer on August 17 over some building operations and Cashman is alleged to have struck Sawyer in the face. 
 
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017 1910 James Cashman punch expense BFP
017 1910 James Cashman punch expense BFP
The Burlington Free Press Thursday, December 1, 1910, page 7. Title reads Punching is Expensive. Suit Brought against J.E. Cashman for $1000. 
 
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017 1910 James Cashman punch expense BFP detail
017 1910 James Cashman punch expense BFP detail
The Burlington Free Press - Punching is Expensive - Suit Brought against J.E. Cashman for $1,000. Adolphus M. Sawyer of 22 George street, employed by the Citizens' Coal company, Tuesday brought an action in trespass against James E. Cashman. The suit was entered in the office of the county clerk. The [illegible] damages is $1000 and J.J. Fixon became recognized as surety for the defendant, Russell W. Taft appears for the plaintiff and Brown & Hopkins for the defendant. It is alleged that on August 21, 1910, Mr. Cashman punched Mr. Sawyer violently in the nose, breaking said nose so completely that it's owner has remained "sick, sore, lame and disordered" to the present day. The quarrel arose, it is alleged, over some blocks which Mr. Cashman was removing from the yards of the [illegible] company. Mr. Sawyer objected to their removal and, it is said, the defendant swatted him without provocation. Mr. Cashman was arraigned in city court shortly after the trouble and charged $25 on a criminal charge. He will now have to face a civil suit. 
 
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017 1910 James E Cashman Alleged Assault BFP
017 1910 James E Cashman Alleged Assault BFP
The Burlington Free Press - Thursday, September 15, 1910, Page 5. 
 
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017 1916 Cashman Must Pay Employee Death
017 1916 Cashman Must Pay Employee Death
Vermont News - Cashman Must Pay For Employee's Death article. 
 
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017 1916 Cashman Must Pay Employee Death detaill
017 1916 Cashman Must Pay Employee Death detaill
Vermont News - Must Pay for Employee's Death - James E. Cashman, of Burlington, has been ordered by the industrial accident board to pay the sum of $4.80 a week for a period of 260 weeks to Mrs. Leroy Shackett, whose husband died June 4 as the result, the board finds, of stepping on a nail while employed by Mr. Cashman in tearing down the back part of the house at the corner of pearl and St. Paul sts. [sic] where the new Roman Catholic school building is to be erected. In addition to the weekly sum, the board directs Mr. Cashman to pay such reasonable surgical, medical, and hospital services and supplies as were occasioned by the accident during the first 14 days after it happened, not to exceed $75, and also the brutal expenses, not to exceed $75. The announcement of the finding by the board says that the accident occurred May 23 and that Mr.Shackett, while engaged in his work, stepped on a nail, suffering a wound in the fleshy part of his foot. The wound healed, but on the eighth day after the accident tetanus developed, resulting in his death June 4. 
 
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017 1917 Cashman Court Reconvenes BFP
017 1917 Cashman Court Reconvenes BFP
The Burlington Press Thursday, April 12, 1917, page 12. The title reads Court Reconvenes, Case of J.S. Hefflon vs. J.E. Cashman for Rent. Taken up. 
 
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017 1917 Cashman Court Reconvenes BFP detail
017 1917 Cashman Court Reconvenes BFP detail
The Burlington Press - Court Reconvenes - Case of J.S. Hefflon vs. J.E. Cashman, for Rent, Taken Up. When Chittenden county court reconvened in this city Monday afternoon the case of John S. Hefflon vs. James E. Cashman, to be tried by jury, was taken up. J.J. Enright and M.G. Leary appear for Mr. Hefflon, and Theodore E. Hopkins is Mr. Cashman's attorney. The case is one of contract, the plaintiff claiming rent for a storage house on a spur of the Rutland railroad. The members of the jury drawn to hear the case are Xiste Blanchette of South Burlington, Octave Cormla of Colchester, James M. Cassidy of Hinesburg, H.H. Hayden of Bolton, L.E. Huntley of Essex, A.T. Mongeon of Colchester, Albert Marcotte of Colchester, A.G. Mott of Burlington, H.J. Metcalf of Underhill, G.V. Roberts of Essex, J.H. Safford of Jericho and M.W.Wells of Huntington. Witnesses called by the plaintiff Monday were the defendant, who testified as to taking over the building used by him for storage purposes. According to book accounts, Mr. Cashman testified that he took the place over about February 1, 1911, and had it up to March 1, 1913, about twenty-two months. It appeared in the testimony that the Texas Oil company had used the building, it being the claim of the plaintiff that the building was sublet to them by the defendant for $15 per month. Mr. Cashman testified that the Texas company did owe him four months rent at $14 per month. On cross-examination Mr. Cashman testified that the building was little better than a shed, having the ground for a floor and being of four walls constructed of rough boards with two openings. He testified that he ex-braced the building and built it a platform, the platform lessening the work of unloading and re-loading containers of gasoline. Mr. Cashman claims the he owes 22 months rent at three dollars per month, according to a verbal contract. Mr. Hefflon, when placed upon the stand, claimed that there was no agreement as to the price which should be paid for the building. After Cashman had vacated Hefflon called upon him for the rent and was told that the place was no good and that he did not suppose he would have to pay rent for it. G.B. Arnold was called. Arnold does a trucking business and claimed to have rented storehouses for other people. He claimed to know the value of the rent of the storehouse, though he testified that he had never been in it and could not remember what kind of a building it was. He stated that it was worth during the time in question from fifteen to eighteen dollars per month. On cross-examination he testified that he had not rented any storehouses during the time in question. 
 
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017 1920 James E Cashman want ad detail
017 1920 James E Cashman want ad detail
Caledonian Record - May 24, 1920. 
 
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017 1928 James E Cashman Praise article
017 1928 James E Cashman Praise article
QUINCY PATRIOT LEDGER-James E. Cashman, bridge builder, has been signally honored for spanning the raging Winooski river between Burlington, Vt., and Winooski, the only means of direct travel between Burlington and Montreal. This unheralded engineering plan is all the more wonderful when one stops to consider that work on the bridge started last March and the bridge was dedicated last week. Added to this fact there remains some difficulties that were overcome when the floods hampered and for a time stopped construction on the bridge. In one instance a huge caisson was washed away by flood. Mr. Cashman is a former resident of Quincy having been born and educated in this city. He is the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Cashman, who were well known by the older folk in the West Quincy district. At the dedication exercises Gov. Weeks of Vermont who made the dedication address paid a high compliment to Mr. Cashman. The bridge builder although confronted with three floods pushed the work ahead with such rapidity to astound all critics who prophesied that the bridge would not be completed within a month of the time set by Mr. Cashman. Unfavorable transportation conditions added to the difficulties as certain important building materials were often delayed for weeks. But for this the bridge would have been opened several weeks earlier. This is not Mr. Cashman's only contribution to the reconstruction in Vermont, however, as he has undertaken to build 11 bridges, the last of which will be completed about the first of November. Mr. Cashman is modest about his achievements and has the highest words of praise for the Detachment of the 1st Engineers of the famous first Division, U.S.A, stationed at Fort Dupont, Delaware, who were pushed to the banks of the Winooski last fall when the floods devastated the district. But for these men there would have been no travel across the river during the winter and spring months. While the dedication of the new bridge was taking place the clang of hammers could be heard as the old pontoon bridge was slowly being removed. The best tribute to the work of the Engineers may be obtained from statistics when it is learned that over a million automobiles and a like number of pedestrians crossed the river on the pontoon bridge in spite of the fact that the river was a raging torrent with rapid rise and fall, ice jams, and severe winter weather. 
 
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017 1931 James Cashman Dies in Vermont
017 1931 James Cashman Dies in Vermont
James Cashman, Quincy Native, Dies in Vermont - James E. Cashman, owner of Vermont's largest contracting business, died in Burlington, Vt., early yesterday afternoon. He was born in Quincy May 22 1876, son of Hannah (Falby) [sic] and John J. Cashman. After being associated with his father in business for a number of years, he became treasurer of the Bay State Dredging and Contracting company of East Boston. He was a member of the Boston City club, Boston Chamber of Commerce, United States Chamber of Commerce and many other business and social organizations. 
 
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017 1931 James E Cashman obituary
017 1931 James E Cashman obituary
James E. Cashman, well known contractor and builder, died yesterday afternoon about 1 o'clock at the Mary Fletcher Hospital of acute dilation of the heart following a minor operation. He had just returned from a trip in the West and went to the hospital Monday. Mr. Cashman has been engaged independently in business in Burlington for more than a quarter of a century and has had contracts for the construction of many of the principal buildings and bridges in the city and State, including Burlington's new City Hall, Memorial Auditorium, Vermont State Armory, the Winooski bridge, the new Parkhill block, Chittenden County Trust Company (now under construction), and many new bridges about the State which were constructed following the flood of 1927. Mr Cashman was born at Quincy Mass., May 22, 1876, son of John and Hannah (Falvey) Cashman. His father was born in Ireland in 1850. He attended the public schools in Quincy, graduating from the high school there in 1893 and began business as associate with his father in the contracting business. For a period of nine years this arrangement continued. Mr Cashman taking an active part in railroad construction building of breakwaters and harbor dredging with which his father was chiefly occupied at the time. He came to Burlington in 1902 and established his company here. He was affiliated with the Burlington Lodge of Elks, the Burlington Country Club, the Lake Champlain Yacht Club, United Commercial Travelers, the Ethan Allen Club, Boston City Club, Burlington Chamber of Commerce, of which he was a director, the Boston Chamber of Commerce and the United States Chamber of Commerce. He was also a member of the construction division of the United States army, a member of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers, New England director of the American Associated General Contractors, and a member of the Associated Industries of Vermont. He was also treasurer of the Bay State Dredging and Contracting Company in Boston. Mr. Cashman is survived by his wife; by his mother, Mrs. John Cashman; by three daughters, Mrs. Frank Dorn, Eleanor and Grace, all of this city; by two sons, James, Jr., of New York city, and Bernard, whose home is here; by two brothers, John of East Milton, Mass., and William of Atlantic, Mass; by four sisters, Mrs. Henry Hamel of Biddeford, Me, Mrs. Thomas O'Brien of East Milton, Mass., Mrs. Daniel Reardon of Quincy, Mass., and Mrs. J.W. Dalton of Sandwich, Mass, and by an uncle, Daniel Falby [sic] of Burlington. Funeral services will be held Friday morning, at 9 o'clock from the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception and burial will be in St. Joseph's cemetery. 
 
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017 1931 James E Cashman obituary Globe
017 1931 James E Cashman obituary Globe
Globe - Burlington, Vt., Feb 24 - James E. Cashman, Vermont's largest general building contractor, died this afternoon of acute dilation of the heart following a minor operation. He was born in Quincy, Mass, May 22, 1876, the son of Hannah (Falby) [sic] Cashman and John J. Cashman. Mr Cashman was associated in business with his father for a number of years and became treasurer of the Bay state Dredging and Contracting Company of East Boston. He started contracting and warehousing in Burlington in 1908, a business he incorporated in 1927, becoming president and treasurer. He was a member of the Boston City Club, Boston Chamber of Commerce, United States Chamber of Commerce, Burlington Chamber of Commerce, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, Knights of Columbus and United Commercial Travelers. 
 
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019 1874 Cashman Falvey marriage QP
019 1874 Cashman Falvey marriage QP
MARRIAGES. In this town, April 12th, by the Rev. F. A. Friguglietti. Mr. John Cashman & Miss Hannah Falvey. [Soure credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1873-Dec 1875; date: 25 Apr 1874; page: 3] 
 
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019 1875 Citizens Caucus QP detail
019 1875 Citizens Caucus QP detail
Quincy Patriot - Feb 13, 1875 - The subscribers, inhabitants of Quincy, feeling satisfied that the general interest of the town are more effectually sub-served by disregarding the lines of political parties in the management of the affairs of the town, desire their fellow citizens who agree with them in this opinion to meet in the Town Hall, on Saturday evening next, at 7:30 o'clock to nominate candidates for all offices to be voted for at March Meeting and to consider the best manner of conducting the public business for the ensuing year. 
 
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019 1876 Katie A Cashman birth announcement QP
019 1876 Katie A Cashman birth announcement QP
FEBRUARY 6, Katie A., duaghter to John and Hannah Cashman. [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm, reel: Jan 1876-Dec 1878; date: 12 Feb 1876; page: 1] 
 
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019 1877 James E Cashman birth announcement QP
019 1877 James E Cashman birth announcement QP
Births in Quincy. The fololowing births have been registered by the Town Clerk in this town for the year 1876. ... May 22, James E., son to John and Hannah Cashman. [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm, reel: Jan 1876-Dec 1878; date: 17 Feb 1877; page: 1] 
 
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019 1878 Quincy Tax Payers QP
019 1878 Quincy Tax Payers QP
John Cashman paid $3.25 in taxes to the city of Quincy in 1878. [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1876-Dec 1878; date: 31 Aug 1878; page: 3] 
 
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019 1880 Quincy Tax Payers QP
019 1880 Quincy Tax Payers QP
John Cashman paid $19 is taxes to the city of Quincy in 1880. [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1879-Dec 1881; date: 21 Aug 1880; page: 3] 
 
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019 1880 William J Cashman birth announcement QP
019 1880 William J Cashman birth announcement QP
Births - In this town, Dec. 22d, a son to Mr. and Mrs. John Cashman. [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1879-Dec 1881; date: 10 Jan 1880; page 3] 
 
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019 1888 John Cashman Road Commissioner
019 1888 John Cashman Road Commissioner
Quincy Patriot - Road Commissioners - Twice did the town of Quincy avail itself of the provisions of the Public Statutes whereby Road Commissioners could be elected. First, in 1882, when they were given a two years trial, and second in 1886 which has continued since. The following gentlemen have served as commissioners: John Q. Adams (1882-83-86-87), Herbert T. Whitman (1882-83), Dr. W.L. Faxon (1882), John Cashman (1883-86-87), Gordon McKenzie (1886-87-88), Quincy Tirrell (1887), John A. Duggan (1887-88), Patrick W. Driscoll (1888). [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1888-Dec 1890; date: 24 Nov 1888; page: 1] 
 
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019 1888 Road Commissioners February Notice
019 1888 Road Commissioners February Notice
Quincy Patriot - NOTICE - The Road Commissioners will meet every Saturday afternoon, from 3 to 4 o'clock, at the Selectmen's Room. All persons having business with the board are requested to present it at their meetings. Gordon McKenzie, John Cashman, John A. Duggan Road Commissioners. [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1888-Dec 1890; date: 11 Feb 1888; page: 2] 
 
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019 1888 Road Commissioners Hearing Notice
019 1888 Road Commissioners Hearing Notice
Quincy, Mass., Feb 8, 1888 - Upon the foregoing petition it is hereby ordered that a public hearing be held at the office of the Road Commissioners, on Wednesday, February 15th, 1888, at 7:30 P.M. Gordon McKenzie, John Cashman, John A. Duggan Road Commissioners of Quincy [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1888-Dec 1890; date: Feb 11, 1888; page: 2] 
 
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019 1888 Road Commissioners January Notice
019 1888 Road Commissioners January Notice
Quincy Patriot - Road Commissioners Notice - All persons having demands against the road-department are requested to present them to the Board of Road Commissioners on or before Saturday, Jan 28th. Persons owing the town for sidewalk construction are also requested to make payment on or before the same date. Gordon McKenzie, John Cashman, John A. Duggan Board of Road Commissioners. [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1888-Dec 1890; date: 14 Jan 1888; page 2] 
 
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019 1890 Fire On Copeland Property
019 1890 Fire On Copeland Property
Quincy Patriot - The alarm from Box 46 at 12:30 Wednesday morning was for a fire discovered in the building formerly occupied as a harness shop and owned by John Cashman, situated on Copeland street directly opposite Hose 3 house. The blaze was seen by a lady living next house who notified her son and he gave the alarm. The fire department responded very promptly but their services were not required. The loss was very small, being less than $10. If it had not been seen so quickly there would probably have been a larger fire as the building is in close proximity to Lacey's machine shop and it would have been hard work to save the latter. So many fires have occurred lately that people are beginning to feel nervous and it would be a good idea to appoint a night watchman to patrol Copeland street. This building remains and it is nothing more than bait for some evil-minded person to set a match to it and probably destroy a large amount of valuable property. [Source credit: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1888-Dec 1890; date: 19 Jul 1890; page 2] 
 
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019 1891 Grammar school graduation
019 1891 Grammar school graduation
Mary Cashman graduated grammar school from the Willard School in 1891. [Source detail: The Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1891-Dec 1893; 4 Jul 1891; page: 3] 
 
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019 1894 John Cashman 70 Acres in Quincy
019 1894 John Cashman 70 Acres in Quincy
This article was published in the Sunday Boston Herald on 15 Jul 1894. 
 
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019 1894 John Cashman 70 Acres in Quincy detail
019 1894 John Cashman 70 Acres in Quincy detail
Sunday Boston Herald - 15 Jul 1894 - Seventy Acres in Quincy - The largest real estate deal which has been consummated in Quincy for a long time has just been  made. A syndicate of Quincy capitalists, represented by John Cashman, has purchased of Hon. John Quincy Adams 70 acres of land on the north easterly section of his extensive property at Mt. Wollaston. The price paid for this large tract was $50,000. The property is located on the easterly side of Sea street, the main thoroughfare between Quincy Centre and Manet Beach, and extends from Breakneck hill on Sea street to Palmer street, and includes the territory on both sides of the latter street nearly to German-town and is locally known as Quincy woods. The tract includes upland, meadow and woodland. It is rumored that a part or a whole of the tract will be laid out for a Catholic cemetery, although this rumor lacks conformation. 
 
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019 1896 Cashman Quarry Death
019 1896 Cashman Quarry Death
Patriot Ledger - Fell Into Quarry - Fatal Accident to Foreman at John Cashman's Quarry - Richard Barry, foreman at John Cashman's quarry had a frightful fall Saturday afternoon from the effects of which he died a short time after. The unfortunate man had been at work in the quarry cleaning off snow and when desiring to come up he caught hold of the hook on the fall and was hoisted up hanging by the hook. The hook was icy cold and that coupled with the weight of Mr.Barry so benumbed his hands that when the top was reached and he had tried to swing himself onto the bank he lost his hold and fell back into the quarry, striking with a dull thud nearly a hundred feet below. Other workmen hastened to his rescue and as there was still life in the body, it was placed on a sled and taken to E.J. Murphy's drug store, where Drs. Sheahan, Dion and Ash were quickly summoned, but the unfortunate man had breathed his last before they arrived, his death probably being due to internal injuries. The remains were taken in charge by Undetaker Brown. Mr. Barry was about 46 years of age and resided at 74 West street. He leaves a widow and five children. 
 
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019 1897 John Cashman recovering
019 1897 John Cashman recovering
Quincy Patriot - Mr. John Cashman, who has been seriously ill with pneumonia, has so far recovered as to be able to be out. [Source detail: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1897-Dec 1899; date:8 Jul 1897; page: 2] 
 
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019 1897 Membership Committee
019 1897 Membership Committee
Quincy Patriot - John Cashman was elected one of five individuals on the Membership Committee for The Granite Manufacturers' Association in Quincy. [Source detail: Quincy Patriot on microfilm; reel: Jan 1897-Dec 1899; date: 14 Aug 1897; page 2] 
 

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